Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Table of contents

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[1. None]
[2. Ex Libris James S. Dearden Rampside]
[3. A DISCOVERY OF A New , OR,]
[4. In Two Parts.]
[5. The Fifth Edition Corrected and Amended. LONDON,]
[6. The Epiſtle to the READER.]
[7. The Propoſitions that are proved in this Diſcourſe. PROPOSITION I.]
[8. PROP. II.]
[9. PROP. III.]
[10. PROP. IV.]
[11. PROP. V.]
[12. PROP. VI.]
[13. PROP. VII.]
[14. PROP. VIII.]
[15. PROP. IX.]
[16. PROP. X.]
[17. PROP. XI.]
[18. PROP. XII.]
[19. PROP. XIII.]
[20. PROP. XIV.]
[21. The Firſt Book. That the MOON May be a WORLD. The Firſt Propoſition, by way of Preface.]
[22. Sed vanus ſtolidis hæc omnia finxerit Error.]
[23. Solis lunæq; labores.]
[24. Cum fruſtra reſonant æra auxiliaria Lunæ.]
[25. Una laboranti poterit ſuccerrere Lunæ.]
[26. Gantus & è cælo poſſunt deducere Lunam.]
[27. Cantus & ſi curru lunam deducere tentant, Et facerent, ſi non æra repulſa ſonant.]
[28. PROP. II. That a Plurality of Worlds doth not contradict any Principle of Reaſon or Faith.]
[29. Æſtuas infelix auguſto limite mundi.]
[30. PROP. III. That the Heavens do not conſiſt of any ſuch pure Matter, which can priviledge them from the like Change and Corruption, as theſe Inferiour, Bodies are liable unto.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
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            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="86" file="0098" n="98" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            & </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">c. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But I reply, if the Superficies betwixt
              <lb/>
            theſe two enlightened parts, remain dark be-
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            cauſe of its Opacity, then would it always be
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            dark, and the Sun could not make it partake of
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            Light, more than it could of Perſpicuity. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But
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            this contradicts all Experience, as you may ſee
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            in Galilæus, who affirms, that when the Sun
              <lb/>
            comes nearer to his Oppoſition, then, that
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            which is betwixt them both, is enlightned as
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            well as either. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Nay, this oppoſes his own Eye-
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            witheſs, for he confeſſes himſelf, that he ſaw this
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            by the glaſs. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">He had ſaid before, that he came
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            to ſee thoſe ſtrange Sights diſcovered by Gali-
              <lb/>
            læus his glaſs, with an intent of Contradiction,
              <lb/>
            and you may read that confirmed in the weak-
              <lb/>
            neſs of this anſwer, which rather bewrays an
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            Obſtinate, then a perſwaded Will; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">for other-
              <lb/>
            wiſe ſure he would never have undertook to
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            have deſtroyed ſuch certain proofs with ſo
              <lb/>
            groundleſs a Fancy.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
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            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0097-01" xlink:href="note-0097-01a" xml:space="preserve">cap. II.</note>
          </div>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">That Inſtance of Galilæus, would have been
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0098-01a" xlink:href="note-0098-01"/>
            a better Evaſion, had this Author been Acquan-
              <lb/>
            ted with it; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">who might then have compared
              <lb/>
            the Moon to that which we call Mother of
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            Pearl, which though it be moſt Exactly Poliſhed
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            in the Superficies of it; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet will ſeem unto the
              <lb/>
            Eye as if there were divers Swellings and Ri-
              <lb/>
            ſings in its ſeveral parts. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But yet this neither
              <lb/>
            would not well have ſhifted the Experiment
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            of the Perſpective. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For theſe rugged parts do
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            not only appear upon one ſide of the Moon, but
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            as the Sun does turn about in Divers Places, ſo
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            do they alſo caſt their ſhadow. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">When theMoon
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            is in her Increaſe, then do they caſt their ſha-
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            dows to the Eaſt. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">When ſhe is in the Decreaſe,</s>
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