Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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[11. PROP. V.]
[12. PROP. VI.]
[13. PROP. VII.]
[14. PROP. VIII.]
[15. PROP. IX.]
[16. PROP. X.]
[17. PROP. XI.]
[18. PROP. XII.]
[19. PROP. XIII.]
[20. PROP. XIV.]
[21. The Firſt Book. That the MOON May be a WORLD. The Firſt Propoſition, by way of Preface.]
[22. Sed vanus ſtolidis hæc omnia finxerit Error.]
[23. Solis lunæq; labores.]
[24. Cum fruſtra reſonant æra auxiliaria Lunæ.]
[25. Una laboranti poterit ſuccerrere Lunæ.]
[26. Gantus & è cælo poſſunt deducere Lunam.]
[27. Cantus & ſi curru lunam deducere tentant, Et facerent, ſi non æra repulſa ſonant.]
[28. PROP. II. That a Plurality of Worlds doth not contradict any Principle of Reaſon or Faith.]
[29. Æſtuas infelix auguſto limite mundi.]
[30. PROP. III. That the Heavens do not conſiſt of any ſuch pure Matter, which can priviledge them from the like Change and Corruption, as theſe Inferiour, Bodies are liable unto.]
[31. Necnon Oceano paſci phæbumque polumq; Gredimus.]
[32. PROP. IV. That the Moon is a Solid, Compacted, Opacous Body.]
[33. PROP. V. That the Moon hath not any Light of her own.]
[34. PROP. VI. That there is a World in the Moon, bath been the direct Opinion of many Ancient, with ſome Modern Mathematicians, and may probably de deduc’d from the Tenents of others.]
[35. PROP. VII. That thoſe Spots and brighter parts, which by our ſight may be diſtinguiſhed in the Moon, do ſhew the difference betwixt the Sea and Land, in that other World.]
[36. PROP. VIII. The Spots repeſent the Sea, and the brighter parts the Land.]
[37. PROP. IX. That there are high Mountains, deep Vallies, and ſpacious Plains in the Body of the Moon.]
[38. PROP. X. That there is an Atmo-ſphæra, or an Orb of groſs, Vaporous Air, immediately encompaſſing the body of the Moon.]
[39. PROP. XI. That as their World is our Moon, ſo our World is their Moon.]
[40. Provehimur portu, terræque urbeſque recedunt.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
For the better Illuſtration oſ this, we may
conſider ſeveral ways whereby divers Bodies
are enlightned.
Either as Water, by admit-
ting the Beams into its Subſtance;
or as Air
and thin Clouds, by Tranſmitting their Rays
quite thorow their Bodies;
or as thoſe things
which are of an Opacous Nature, and ſmooth
Superficies, which reflect the Light only in
one place;
or elſe, as thoſe things which are
of an Opacous Nature, and Rugged Superſi-
cies, which by a kind of Circumfluous Re-
flexion, are at the ſame time Diſcernable in
many places, as our Earth, and the Moon.
2. It is Compact, and not a Spungey and
2Porous Subſtance.
But this is denyed by (a)
Diogenes, (b) Vitellio, (c) Reinoldus, and ſome
a Plut. de
pla. phil.
l. 2. c. 13.
b Opt.lib.4.
c Com. Pur-
bac. Theo.p.
164.
other, who held the Moon to be of the ſame
kind of Nature as a Pumice-Sone;
and this,
ſay they, is the reaſon why in the Suns Eclipſes
there appears within her a duskiſh ruddy Co-
lour, becauſe the Sun Beams being Refracted
in paſſing through the Pores of her Body, muſt
neceſſarily be Repreſented under ſuch a Co-
lour.
But I Reply, if this be the Cauſe of her
Redneſs, then why doth ſhe not appear under
the ſame Form when ſhe is about a Sextile Aſ-
pect, and the Darkned part of her Body is
Diſcernable?
for then alſo do the ſame Rays
paſs through Her, and therefore in all likely-
hood ſhould produce the ſame Effect;
and
notwithſtanding thoſeBeams are then diverted
from us, that they cannot enter into our Eyes
by a ſtraight Line, yet muſt the Colour ſtill
remain Viſible in her Body.
And beſides, ac-

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