Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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[11. PROP. V.]
[12. PROP. VI.]
[13. PROP. VII.]
[14. PROP. VIII.]
[15. PROP. IX.]
[16. PROP. X.]
[17. PROP. XI.]
[18. PROP. XII.]
[19. PROP. XIII.]
[20. PROP. XIV.]
[21. The Firſt Book. That the MOON May be a WORLD. The Firſt Propoſition, by way of Preface.]
[22. Sed vanus ſtolidis hæc omnia finxerit Error.]
[23. Solis lunæq; labores.]
[24. Cum fruſtra reſonant æra auxiliaria Lunæ.]
[25. Una laboranti poterit ſuccerrere Lunæ.]
[26. Gantus & è cælo poſſunt deducere Lunam.]
[27. Cantus & ſi curru lunam deducere tentant, Et facerent, ſi non æra repulſa ſonant.]
[28. PROP. II. That a Plurality of Worlds doth not contradict any Principle of Reaſon or Faith.]
[29. Æſtuas infelix auguſto limite mundi.]
[30. PROP. III. That the Heavens do not conſiſt of any ſuch pure Matter, which can priviledge them from the like Change and Corruption, as theſe Inferiour, Bodies are liable unto.]
[31. Necnon Oceano paſci phæbumque polumq; Gredimus.]
[32. PROP. IV. That the Moon is a Solid, Compacted, Opacous Body.]
[33. PROP. V. That the Moon hath not any Light of her own.]
[34. PROP. VI. That there is a World in the Moon, bath been the direct Opinion of many Ancient, with ſome Modern Mathematicians, and may probably de deduc’d from the Tenents of others.]
[35. PROP. VII. That thoſe Spots and brighter parts, which by our ſight may be diſtinguiſhed in the Moon, do ſhew the difference betwixt the Sea and Land, in that other World.]
[36. PROP. VIII. The Spots repeſent the Sea, and the brighter parts the Land.]
[37. PROP. IX. That there are high Mountains, deep Vallies, and ſpacious Plains in the Body of the Moon.]
[38. PROP. X. That there is an Atmo-ſphæra, or an Orb of groſs, Vaporous Air, immediately encompaſſing the body of the Moon.]
[39. PROP. XI. That as their World is our Moon, ſo our World is their Moon.]
[40. Provehimur portu, terræque urbeſque recedunt.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
Nor may we think that the Earth's Shadow
can Cloud the proper Light of the Moon from
Appearing, or take away any thing from her
Inherent Brightneſs;
for this were to think a
Shadow to be a Body, an Opinion altogether
misbecoming a Philoſopher, as Tycho grants
in the fore-cited place, Nec umbra terrœ corpo-
reum quid eſt, aut denſa aliqua ſubſtantia, ut Lu-
nœ lumen obtenebrare poſſit, atque id viſui noſtro
prœripere, ſed eſt quœdam privatio luminis ſola-
ris, ob interpoſitum opacum corpus terrœ.
Nor
is the Earth's ſhadow any Corporal thing,
or thick ſubſtance, that it can Cloud the
Moons Brightneſs, or take it away from our
Sight;
but it is a meer privation of the Suns
Light by reaſon of her Interpoſition of the
Earth's Opacous Body.
3 If ſhe had any Light of her own, then
that would in it ſelf be either ſuch a ruddy
Brightneſs as appears in the Eclipſes, or elſe
ſuch a Leaden Duskiſh Light as we ſee in the
Darker parts of her Body, when ſhe is a little
paſt the Conjunction.
(That it muſt be one
of theſe, may follow from the Oppoſite Ar-
guments) but it is neither of theſe;
therefore
ſhe hath none of her own.
1. ’Tis not ſuch a ruddy Light as appears in
Eclipſes;
for then why can we not ſee the
like redneſs, when we may diſcern the Ob-
ſcure parts of the Moon?
You will ſay, perhaps, that then the near-
neſs of that greater Light takes away that Ap-
pearance.
I Reply, this cannot be; for then why does
Mars ſhine with his wonted Redneſs, when

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