Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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[11. PROP. V.]
[12. PROP. VI.]
[13. PROP. VII.]
[14. PROP. VIII.]
[15. PROP. IX.]
[16. PROP. X.]
[17. PROP. XI.]
[18. PROP. XII.]
[19. PROP. XIII.]
[20. PROP. XIV.]
[21. The Firſt Book. That the MOON May be a WORLD. The Firſt Propoſition, by way of Preface.]
[22. Sed vanus ſtolidis hæc omnia finxerit Error.]
[23. Solis lunæq; labores.]
[24. Cum fruſtra reſonant æra auxiliaria Lunæ.]
[25. Una laboranti poterit ſuccerrere Lunæ.]
[26. Gantus & è cælo poſſunt deducere Lunam.]
[27. Cantus & ſi curru lunam deducere tentant, Et facerent, ſi non æra repulſa ſonant.]
[28. PROP. II. That a Plurality of Worlds doth not contradict any Principle of Reaſon or Faith.]
[29. Æſtuas infelix auguſto limite mundi.]
[30. PROP. III. That the Heavens do not conſiſt of any ſuch pure Matter, which can priviledge them from the like Change and Corruption, as theſe Inferiour, Bodies are liable unto.]
[31. Necnon Oceano paſci phæbumque polumq; Gredimus.]
[32. PROP. IV. That the Moon is a Solid, Compacted, Opacous Body.]
[33. PROP. V. That the Moon hath not any Light of her own.]
[34. PROP. VI. That there is a World in the Moon, bath been the direct Opinion of many Ancient, with ſome Modern Mathematicians, and may probably de deduc’d from the Tenents of others.]
[35. PROP. VII. That thoſe Spots and brighter parts, which by our ſight may be diſtinguiſhed in the Moon, do ſhew the difference betwixt the Sea and Land, in that other World.]
[36. PROP. VIII. The Spots repeſent the Sea, and the brighter parts the Land.]
[37. PROP. IX. That there are high Mountains, deep Vallies, and ſpacious Plains in the Body of the Moon.]
[38. PROP. X. That there is an Atmo-ſphæra, or an Orb of groſs, Vaporous Air, immediately encompaſſing the body of the Moon.]
[39. PROP. XI. That as their World is our Moon, ſo our World is their Moon.]
[40. Provehimur portu, terræque urbeſque recedunt.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
feign to put in a Fable, our more happy Age
hath found out in a Truth, and we may diſcern
with theſeEyes whichGalilæus hath beſtow’d as
far upon us, as Lynceus could with thoſe which
the Poets attributed unto him.
But if you yet
doubt, whether all theſe Obſervations were
true, the ſame Author may conſirm you, when
he ſays they were ſhewed, Non uni aut alteri,
ſed quam plurimis, neque gregariis hominibus, ſed
cap. I.præcipuis atque diſciplinis omnibus, necnon Ma-
thematicis &
Opticis prœceptis optimè inſtructis
ſedulâ ac diligenti inſpectione.
‘Not to one or
‘ two, but to very many, and thoſe not ordi-
‘ nary Men, but to thoſe who were well vers’d
‘ in Mathematicks and Opticks, and that not
‘ with a meer glance, but with a ſedulous and
‘ diligent Inſpection.
And leaſt any ſcruple
might remain unanſwer’d, or you might think
the Men who beheld all this, tho’ they might
be skilful, yet they came with credulous minds,
and ſo were more eaſie to be deluded:
He
adds, that it was ſhewed, Viris qui ad experi-
menta hæc contradicendi animo acceſſerant.
‘To
cap. 5.‘ ſuch as were come with a great deal of Pre-
‘ judice, and an intent oſ Contradiction.
Thus
you may ſee the certainty of thoſe Experiments
which were taken by this Glaſs.
I have ſpoken
the more concerning it, becauſe I ſhall borrow
many things in my farther Diſcourſe, from
thoſe Diſcoveries which were made by it.
I have now Cited ſuch Authors both Anci-
ent and Modern, who have directly maintain’d
the ſame Opinion.
I told you you likewiſe in
See the fe-
cond Book.
1 Prop.
the Propoſition, that it might probably be de-
duc’d from the Tenents of others:
ſuch were

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