Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Table of contents

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[11. PROP. V.]
[12. PROP. VI.]
[13. PROP. VII.]
[14. PROP. VIII.]
[15. PROP. IX.]
[16. PROP. X.]
[17. PROP. XI.]
[18. PROP. XII.]
[19. PROP. XIII.]
[20. PROP. XIV.]
[21. The Firſt Book. That the MOON May be a WORLD. The Firſt Propoſition, by way of Preface.]
[22. Sed vanus ſtolidis hæc omnia finxerit Error.]
[23. Solis lunæq; labores.]
[24. Cum fruſtra reſonant æra auxiliaria Lunæ.]
[25. Una laboranti poterit ſuccerrere Lunæ.]
[26. Gantus & è cælo poſſunt deducere Lunam.]
[27. Cantus & ſi curru lunam deducere tentant, Et facerent, ſi non æra repulſa ſonant.]
[28. PROP. II. That a Plurality of Worlds doth not contradict any Principle of Reaſon or Faith.]
[29. Æſtuas infelix auguſto limite mundi.]
[30. PROP. III. That the Heavens do not conſiſt of any ſuch pure Matter, which can priviledge them from the like Change and Corruption, as theſe Inferiour, Bodies are liable unto.]
[31. Necnon Oceano paſci phæbumque polumq; Gredimus.]
[32. PROP. IV. That the Moon is a Solid, Compacted, Opacous Body.]
[33. PROP. V. That the Moon hath not any Light of her own.]
[34. PROP. VI. That there is a World in the Moon, bath been the direct Opinion of many Ancient, with ſome Modern Mathematicians, and may probably de deduc’d from the Tenents of others.]
[35. PROP. VII. That thoſe Spots and brighter parts, which by our ſight may be diſtinguiſhed in the Moon, do ſhew the difference betwixt the Sea and Land, in that other World.]
[36. PROP. VIII. The Spots repeſent the Sea, and the brighter parts the Land.]
[37. PROP. IX. That there are high Mountains, deep Vallies, and ſpacious Plains in the Body of the Moon.]
[38. PROP. X. That there is an Atmo-ſphæra, or an Orb of groſs, Vaporous Air, immediately encompaſſing the body of the Moon.]
[39. PROP. XI. That as their World is our Moon, ſo our World is their Moon.]
[40. Provehimur portu, terræque urbeſque recedunt.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="99" file="0111" n="111" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            riences which Men of latter times have found
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            out, for the Confirmation of this Truth.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Unto him aſſents Macrobius; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">whoſe
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            Words are theſe; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Terra accepto ſolis lumine cla-
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            reſcit tantummodò, non relucet. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">‘The Earth is
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0111-01a" xlink:href="note-0111-01"/>
            ‘ by the Sun Beams made Bright, but not able
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            ‘ to Enlighten any thing ſo far. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And his Rea-
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            ſon is, becauſe this being of a thick and Groſs
              <lb/>
            matter, the light is terminated in its Superſicies,
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            and cannot Penetrate into the Subſtance, where-
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            as the Moon doth therefore ſeem ſo Bright to
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            us, becauſe it receives the Beams within it ſelf.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But the Weakneſs of this Aſſertion, may be
              <lb/>
            eaſily Maniſeſt by a common Experience; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">po-
              <lb/>
            liſhed Steel (whoſe Opacity will not give any
              <lb/>
            Admittance to the Raies) reſlects a ſtronger
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            Heat than Glaſs, and ſo Conſequently a greater
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            Light.</s>
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            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0111-01" xlink:href="note-0111-01a" xml:space="preserve">Somn. Scip.
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            l. 1. c. 19.</note>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">3. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis the general Conſent of Philoſophers,
              <lb/>
            that the Reflection of the Sun-Beams from the
              <lb/>
            Earth doth not reach much above half a
              <lb/>
            Mile high, where they Terminate the firſt Re-
              <lb/>
            gion, ſo that to Affirm they might aſcend to
              <lb/>
            the Moon, were to ſay, there were but one
              <lb/>
            Region of Air, which Contradicts the proved
              <lb/>
            and received Opinion.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Unto this it may be Anſwered:</s>
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          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">That it is indeed the common Conſent, that
              <lb/>
            the Reſlection of the Sun-Beams reach only to
              <lb/>
            the Second Region; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but yet ſome there are,
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            and thoſe too, Philoſophers, of good Note,
              <lb/>
            who thought otherwiſe. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus Plotinus is Cited
              <lb/>
            by Cælius, ſi concipiat te in ſublimi quopiam mun-
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0111-02a" xlink:href="note-0111-02"/>
            di loco, unde oculis ſubjiciatur terræ moles aquis
              <lb/>
            circumfuſa, & </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſolis ſyderumq; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">radiis illuſtrata,</s>
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