Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Table of contents

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[11. PROP. V.]
[12. PROP. VI.]
[13. PROP. VII.]
[14. PROP. VIII.]
[15. PROP. IX.]
[16. PROP. X.]
[17. PROP. XI.]
[18. PROP. XII.]
[19. PROP. XIII.]
[20. PROP. XIV.]
[21. The Firſt Book. That the MOON May be a WORLD. The Firſt Propoſition, by way of Preface.]
[22. Sed vanus ſtolidis hæc omnia finxerit Error.]
[23. Solis lunæq; labores.]
[24. Cum fruſtra reſonant æra auxiliaria Lunæ.]
[25. Una laboranti poterit ſuccerrere Lunæ.]
[26. Gantus & è cælo poſſunt deducere Lunam.]
[27. Cantus & ſi curru lunam deducere tentant, Et facerent, ſi non æra repulſa ſonant.]
[28. PROP. II. That a Plurality of Worlds doth not contradict any Principle of Reaſon or Faith.]
[29. Æſtuas infelix auguſto limite mundi.]
[30. PROP. III. That the Heavens do not conſiſt of any ſuch pure Matter, which can priviledge them from the like Change and Corruption, as theſe Inferiour, Bodies are liable unto.]
[31. Necnon Oceano paſci phæbumque polumq; Gredimus.]
[32. PROP. IV. That the Moon is a Solid, Compacted, Opacous Body.]
[33. PROP. V. That the Moon hath not any Light of her own.]
[34. PROP. VI. That there is a World in the Moon, bath been the direct Opinion of many Ancient, with ſome Modern Mathematicians, and may probably de deduc’d from the Tenents of others.]
[35. PROP. VII. That thoſe Spots and brighter parts, which by our ſight may be diſtinguiſhed in the Moon, do ſhew the difference betwixt the Sea and Land, in that other World.]
[36. PROP. VIII. The Spots repeſent the Sea, and the brighter parts the Land.]
[37. PROP. IX. That there are high Mountains, deep Vallies, and ſpacious Plains in the Body of the Moon.]
[38. PROP. X. That there is an Atmo-ſphæra, or an Orb of groſs, Vaporous Air, immediately encompaſſing the body of the Moon.]
[39. PROP. XI. That as their World is our Moon, ſo our World is their Moon.]
[40. Provehimur portu, terræque urbeſque recedunt.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
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            our Gifts, and beat us with our own Wea-
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            pons) hath ſo contriv’d it, that any Truth doth
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            now ſeem diſtaſtful for that very Reaſon, for
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            which Errour is entertain’d: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Novelty. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For
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            let ſome upſtart Hereſie be ſet abroach, and
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            preſently there are ſome out of a curious Hu-
              <lb/>
            mour; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">others, as if they watched an occaſion of
              <lb/>
            ſingularity, will take it up for Canonical, and
              <lb/>
            make it part of their Creed and Profeſſion;
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">whereas ſolitary Truth cannot any where find
              <lb/>
            ſo ready Entertainment; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but the ſame Novel-
              <lb/>
            ty which is eſteemed the Commendation of
              <lb/>
            Errour, and makes that acceptable, is counted
              <lb/>
            the fault of Truth, and cauſes that to be Re-
              <lb/>
            jected.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">How did the incredulous World gaze at Co-
              <lb/>
            lumbus; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">when he promiſed to diſcover ano-
              <lb/>
            ther part of the Earth, and he could not for
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            a long time, by his Confidence, or Argu-
              <lb/>
            ments, induce any of the Chriſtian Princes, ei-
              <lb/>
            ther to aſſent unto his Opinion, or to go to the
              <lb/>
            charges of an Experiment? </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now if be, who
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            had ſuch good grounds for his Aſſertion, could
              <lb/>
            find no better Entertainment among the wiſer
              <lb/>
            ſort, and upper end of the World; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’tis not
              <lb/>
            likely then that this Opinion which I now deli-
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            ver, ſhall receive any thing from Men of theſe
              <lb/>
            Days, eſpecially our Vulgar Wits, but Miſ-
              <lb/>
            belief and Deriſion.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">It hath always been the unhappineſs of new
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            Truths in Philoſophy, to be derided by thoſe
              <lb/>
            that are ignorant of the cauſes of things, and
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            rejected by others, whoſe perverſeneſs ties
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            them to the contrary Opinion, Men whoſe en-
              <lb/>
            vious Pride will not allow any new thing for</s>
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