Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Table of contents

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[11. PROP. V.]
[12. PROP. VI.]
[13. PROP. VII.]
[14. PROP. VIII.]
[15. PROP. IX.]
[16. PROP. X.]
[17. PROP. XI.]
[18. PROP. XII.]
[19. PROP. XIII.]
[20. PROP. XIV.]
[21. The Firſt Book. That the MOON May be a WORLD. The Firſt Propoſition, by way of Preface.]
[22. Sed vanus ſtolidis hæc omnia finxerit Error.]
[23. Solis lunæq; labores.]
[24. Cum fruſtra reſonant æra auxiliaria Lunæ.]
[25. Una laboranti poterit ſuccerrere Lunæ.]
[26. Gantus & è cælo poſſunt deducere Lunam.]
[27. Cantus & ſi curru lunam deducere tentant, Et facerent, ſi non æra repulſa ſonant.]
[28. PROP. II. That a Plurality of Worlds doth not contradict any Principle of Reaſon or Faith.]
[29. Æſtuas infelix auguſto limite mundi.]
[30. PROP. III. That the Heavens do not conſiſt of any ſuch pure Matter, which can priviledge them from the like Change and Corruption, as theſe Inferiour, Bodies are liable unto.]
[31. Necnon Oceano paſci phæbumque polumq; Gredimus.]
[32. PROP. IV. That the Moon is a Solid, Compacted, Opacous Body.]
[33. PROP. V. That the Moon hath not any Light of her own.]
[34. PROP. VI. That there is a World in the Moon, bath been the direct Opinion of many Ancient, with ſome Modern Mathematicians, and may probably de deduc’d from the Tenents of others.]
[35. PROP. VII. That thoſe Spots and brighter parts, which by our ſight may be diſtinguiſhed in the Moon, do ſhew the difference betwixt the Sea and Land, in that other World.]
[36. PROP. VIII. The Spots repeſent the Sea, and the brighter parts the Land.]
[37. PROP. IX. That there are high Mountains, deep Vallies, and ſpacious Plains in the Body of the Moon.]
[38. PROP. X. That there is an Atmo-ſphæra, or an Orb of groſs, Vaporous Air, immediately encompaſſing the body of the Moon.]
[39. PROP. XI. That as their World is our Moon, ſo our World is their Moon.]
[40. Provehimur portu, terræque urbeſque recedunt.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
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            other place then wherein it is. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But now this
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            would be ſuch an Inconvenience, as would
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            quite ſubvert the grounds and whole Art of
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            Aſtronomy, and therefore is by no means to
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            be admitted.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Unto this it is commonly Anſwer'd, that
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            all thoſe Orbs are equally Diaphanus, though
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            not of a continued quantity. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">We reply, that
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            ſuppoſing they were, yet this cannot hinder
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            them from being the Cauſes of Refraction,
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            which is produc'd as well by the Diverſity of
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            Superſicies, as the different Perſpicuity of Bo-
              <lb/>
            dies. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Two Glaſſes put together, will cauſe a
              <lb/>
            divers Refraction from another ſingle one,
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            that is but of Equal Thickneſs and Perſpicu-
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            ity.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">3. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From the different Height or the ſame
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            Planet at ſeveral times. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For if according to
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            the uſual Hypotheſis, there ſhould be ſuch di-
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            ſtinct, Solid Orbs, then it would be impoſſi-
              <lb/>
            ble that the Planets ſhould intrench upon one
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            anothers Orbs, or that two of them at ſeveral
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            Times ſhould be above one another, which
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            notwithſtanding hath been prov'd to be ſo by
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            later Experience. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Tycho hath obſerv'd, that
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            Venus is ſometimes nearer than the Sun or Mer-
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            cury, and ſometimes farther off than both;
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">which appearances Regiomontanus himſelf does
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            Acknowledge, and withal, does confeſs that
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            they cannot be reconciled to the common Hy-
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            potheſis.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But for your better Satisſaction herein, I
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            ſhall refer you to the above nam'd Scheiner,
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            in his Roſa Urſina, in whom you may ſee both
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            Authorities and Reaſon, very Largely and</s>
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