Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Table of contents

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[11. PROP. V.]
[12. PROP. VI.]
[13. PROP. VII.]
[14. PROP. VIII.]
[15. PROP. IX.]
[16. PROP. X.]
[17. PROP. XI.]
[18. PROP. XII.]
[19. PROP. XIII.]
[20. PROP. XIV.]
[21. The Firſt Book. That the MOON May be a WORLD. The Firſt Propoſition, by way of Preface.]
[22. Sed vanus ſtolidis hæc omnia finxerit Error.]
[23. Solis lunæq; labores.]
[24. Cum fruſtra reſonant æra auxiliaria Lunæ.]
[25. Una laboranti poterit ſuccerrere Lunæ.]
[26. Gantus & è cælo poſſunt deducere Lunam.]
[27. Cantus & ſi curru lunam deducere tentant, Et facerent, ſi non æra repulſa ſonant.]
[28. PROP. II. That a Plurality of Worlds doth not contradict any Principle of Reaſon or Faith.]
[29. Æſtuas infelix auguſto limite mundi.]
[30. PROP. III. That the Heavens do not conſiſt of any ſuch pure Matter, which can priviledge them from the like Change and Corruption, as theſe Inferiour, Bodies are liable unto.]
[31. Necnon Oceano paſci phæbumque polumq; Gredimus.]
[32. PROP. IV. That the Moon is a Solid, Compacted, Opacous Body.]
[33. PROP. V. That the Moon hath not any Light of her own.]
[34. PROP. VI. That there is a World in the Moon, bath been the direct Opinion of many Ancient, with ſome Modern Mathematicians, and may probably de deduc’d from the Tenents of others.]
[35. PROP. VII. That thoſe Spots and brighter parts, which by our ſight may be diſtinguiſhed in the Moon, do ſhew the difference betwixt the Sea and Land, in that other World.]
[36. PROP. VIII. The Spots repeſent the Sea, and the brighter parts the Land.]
[37. PROP. IX. That there are high Mountains, deep Vallies, and ſpacious Plains in the Body of the Moon.]
[38. PROP. X. That there is an Atmo-ſphæra, or an Orb of groſs, Vaporous Air, immediately encompaſſing the body of the Moon.]
[39. PROP. XI. That as their World is our Moon, ſo our World is their Moon.]
[40. Provehimur portu, terræque urbeſque recedunt.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="53" file="0065" n="65" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            in hac terra, &</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">c. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">As if he had conceived the
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            Moon to be a great hollow Body, in the midſt
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            oſ whoſe Concavity, there ſhould be another
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            Globe oſ Sea and Land, inhabited by Men, as
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            as our Earth is. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Whereas it ſeems to be
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            more likely by the Relation of others, that
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            this Philoſophers Opinion is to be underſtood
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            in the ſame Senſe, as it is here to be prov’d.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">True indeed, the Father condemns this Aſſer-
              <lb/>
            tion as an equal Abſurdity to that of Anaxaga-
              <lb/>
            ras, who affirm’d the Snow to be black: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but
              <lb/>
            no wonder, for in the very next Chapter, it is
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            that he does ſo much deride the Opinion of
              <lb/>
            thoſe who thought there were Antipodes. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So
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            that his ignorance in that particular, may per-
              <lb/>
            haps diſable him from being a Competent
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            Judge in any other like point in Philoſophy. </s>
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              <lb/>
            Upon theſe agreed Pythagoras, who thought
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            that our Earth was but one of the Planets
              <lb/>
            which mov’d round about the Sun, (as Ari-
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            ſtotle relates of him) and the Pythagoreans in
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            general did affirm, that the Moon was alſo Ter-
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            reſtrial, and that ſhe was Inhabited as this low-
              <lb/>
            er World; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">That thoſe living Creatures and
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            Plants which are in her, exceed any of the
              <lb/>
            like kind, with us in the ſame proportion, as
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0065-02a" xlink:href="note-0065-02"/>
            their Days are longer than ours, viz. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">by 15.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">times. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">This Pythagoras was eſteem’d by all of a
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            moſt Divine Wit, as appears eſpecially by his
              <lb/>
            valuation amongſt the Romans, who being com-
              <lb/>
            manded by the Oracle to erecta Statue to the
              <lb/>
            wiſeſt Græcian, the Senate determin’d Pythago-
              <lb/>
            ras to be meant, preferring him in their Judge-
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0065-03a" xlink:href="note-0065-03"/>
            ment before the Divine Socrates, whom their
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            Gods pronounc’d the Wiſeſt. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Some think</s>
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