Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="108" file="0120" n="120" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            niences of Habitation, as the others that are
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            more Principal.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">But it may ſeem a very difficult thing to
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            conceive, how ſo groſs and Dark a Body as
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            our Earth, ſhould yield ſuch a clear Light as
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            proceeds from the Moon; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and therefore Car-
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0120-01a" xlink:href="note-0120-01"/>
            dinal de Cuſa (who thinks every Star to be a ſe-
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            veral World) is of Opinion, that the Light
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            of the Sun is not able to make them appear ſo
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            bright; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but the reaſon of their ſhining is, be-
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            cauſe we behold them at a great diſtance
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            through their Regions of Fire which do ſet a
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            ſhining Luſtre upon thoſe Bodies that of them-
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            ſelves are dark. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Unde ſi quis eſſet extra regio-
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            nem ignis, terra iſta in circumferentia ſuæ regio-
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            nis per medium ignis lucida ſtella appareret. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">‘So
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            ‘that, if a Man were beyond the Region of
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            ‘Fire, this Earth would appear through that
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            ‘as a bright Star. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But if this were the only
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            Reaſon, then would the Moon be freed from
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            ſuch Increaſes and Decreaſes as ſhe is now lya-
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            ble unto.</s>
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            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0120-01" xlink:href="note-0120-01a" xml:space="preserve">De Dog. ig.
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            l. 3. c. 12.</note>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">Keplar thinks that our Earth receives that
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            Light whereby it ſhines, from the Sun, but
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            this (ſaith he) is not ſuch an intended clear
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            brightneſs as the Moon is capable of, and there-
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            fore he gueſfes, that the Earth there is of a
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            more choky ſoil, like the Iſle of Grete, and ſo
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            is better able to reſlect a ſtronger Light, where-
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            as our Earth muſt ſupply this Intention with
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            the quantity of his Body. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But this I concieve
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            to be a needleſs Conjecture, ſince our Earth,
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            if all things were well conſider’d, will be
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            found able enough to reflect as great a Light.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For,</s>
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