Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="132" file="0144" n="144" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            of Hell, and that number expreſſes the Dia-
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            meter of its Concavity, which is 200 Italian
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            Miles; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But Leſſius thinks that this Opinion
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            gives them too much Room in Hell, and there-
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            fore he gueſſes that ’tis not ſo wide; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">for (faith
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            he) the Diameter of one League being cubi-
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            cally multiplyed, will make a Sphere capable
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            of 800000 Millions of damaed Bodies, allow-
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            ing to each ſix Foot in the Square; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">whereas,
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            ſays he, ’tis certain, that there ſhall not be
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            one hundred thouſand Milions in all that ſhall
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            be damned. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">You ſee the bold Jeſuit was care-
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            ful that every one ſhould have but room enough
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            in Hell, and by the ſtrangeneſs of the Con-
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            jecture, you may gueſs that he had rather be
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            abſurd, than ſeem either uncharitable or igno-
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            rant. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I remember there is a Relation in Pliny,
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            how that Dionyſidorous a Mathematician, be-
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            ing Dead, did ſend a Letter from this place to
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            ſome of his Friends upon Earth, to certifie
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            them what diſtance there was betwixt the
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            Centre and Superficies: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">he might have done
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            well to have prevented this Controverſie, and
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            inform’d them the utmoſt capacity of the place.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">However, certain it is, that that number can-
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            not be known; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and probable it is, that the place
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            is not yet determin’d, but that Hell is there
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            where there is any tormented Soul, which may
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            be in the Regions of the Air, as well as in the
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            Centre: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and therefore perhaps it is, that the
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            Devil is ſtyled the Prince of the Air. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But this
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            only occaſionally, and by reaſon of Plutarch’s
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            Opinion concerning thoſe that are round about
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            the Moon; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">as for the Moon it ſelf, he eſteems
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            it to be a lower kind of Heaven, and there-</s>
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