Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="152" file="0332" n="332" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            aſcending ſome high Tower, to ſave the
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            labour of ſtirring his Head, ſhould rather
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            deſire that all the Regions might ſucceſſively
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            be turned before his Eye, that ſo he might
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            eaſily take a view of them.</s>
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            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0331-01" xlink:href="note-0331-01a" xml:space="preserve">Galen.</note>
            <note symbol="*" position="right" xlink:label="note-0331-02" xlink:href="note-0331-02a" xml:space="preserve">Lansberg</note>
            <note symbol="" position="right" xlink:label="note-0331-03" xlink:href="note-0331-03a" xml:space="preserve">Kep'ar.</note>
            <note symbol="*" position="right" xlink:label="note-0331-04" xlink:href="note-0331-04a" xml:space="preserve">Gallilæ-
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            us.</note>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">We allow every Watch-maker ſo much
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            wiſdom, as not to put any Motion in his
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            Inſtrument, which is ſuperfluous, or may be
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            ſupplied an eaſier way : </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And ſhall we not
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            think that Nature has as much providence
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            as every ordinary Mechanick? </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Or can we
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            imagine that She ſhould appoint thoſe nu-
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            merous and vaſt Bodies, the Stars, to com-
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            paſs us with ſuch a ſwift and reſtleſs Mo-
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            tion, ſo full of confuſion and uncertain-
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            ties, when as all this might as well be
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            done by the Revolution of this little Ball of
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            Earth?</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">Arg. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">3. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Amongſt the ſeveral parts of
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            the World, there are ſix Planets which are
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            generally granted to move. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">As for the Sun
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            and the Earth, and the fixed Stars, it is
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            yet in queſtion, which of them are natu-
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            rally indowed with the ſame condition.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now common reaſon will dictate unto us,
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            that Motion is moſt agreeable to that which
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            in kind and properties is moſt near to thoſe
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            Bodies that undoubtedly are moved. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But
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            now there is one eminent qualification,
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            wherein the Earth does agree with the Pla-
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            nets; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">whereas the Sun, together with the
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            fixed Stars, do in the ſame reſpect differ
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            from them : </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and that is Light, which all
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            the Planets, and ſo too the Earth, are fain</s>
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