Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="63" file="0243" n="243" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            riſing of it in the midſt, does ſo intercept
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            our ſight from either of thoſe places, that
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            we cannot look in a ſtreight Line from the
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            one to the other. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So that it may ſeem to be
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            no leſs than a Miracle, by which the Sea
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            (being a heavy Body) was with-held from
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            flowing down to thoſe lower places of B, or
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            C. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But now, if you conſider that the aſ-
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            cending of a Body, is its motion from the
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            Centre; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and deſcent, is its approaching
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            unto it: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">you ſhall find, that the Sea to move
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            from D, to B or C, is a motion of Aſcent,
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            which is contrary to its nature, becauſe the
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            Mountain at B, or C, are farther off from
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            the Centre, than the Sea at D, the Lines
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            A B, and A C, being longer than the other
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            A D. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So that for the Sea to keep always
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            in its Channel, is but agreeable to its Na-
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            ture, as being a heavy Body. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But the mean-
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            ing of thoſe Scriptures, is, to ſet forth the
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            Power and Wiſdom of God; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">who hath ap-
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            pointed theſe Channels for it, and beſet it
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            with ſuch ſtrong Banks, to withſtand the
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            fury of its waves. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Or if theſe Men do ſo
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            much rely in natural Points, upon the bare
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            words of Scripture, they might eaſily be
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            confuted from thoſe other places, where
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            God is ſaid to have founded the Earth upon
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            the Seas, and eſtabliſhed it upon the Floods.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From the literal interpretation of which,
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            many of the Ancients have fallen into ano-
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            ther Error; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">affirming, the Water to be in
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            the lower place; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and as a baſis, whereon the
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            the weight of the Earth was born up. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Of</s>
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