Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Table of contents

< >
< >
page |< < (92) of 370 > >|
That the Earth may be a Planet.
    <echo version="1.0RC">
      <text xml:lang="en" type="free">
        <div type="section" level="1" n="60">
          <pb o="92" file="0272" n="272" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">3. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis conſiderable, That the Spheres of
              <lb/>
            Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, are, according to the
              <lb/>
            general opinion, of very great extenſion ;
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and yet each of them is appointed only to
              <lb/>
            carry about its particular Planet, which are
              <lb/>
            but very little in compariſon of the fixed
              <lb/>
            Stars. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now if for the ſcituation of theſe
              <lb/>
            fixed Stars, there ſhould be allotted a pro-
              <lb/>
            portionable part of the World, ’tis certain,
              <lb/>
            that their Orb muſt be far bigger than it is
              <lb/>
            commonly ſuppoſed, and very near to this
              <lb/>
            Opinion of Copernicus.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">4. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">We uſually judg the bigneſs of the
              <lb/>
            higher Orbs, by their different motions. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">As
              <lb/>
            becauſe Saturn finiſhes his courſe in thirty
              <lb/>
            Years, and Jupiter in twelve, therefore we
              <lb/>
            attribute unto thoſe Orbs, ſuch a different
              <lb/>
            proportion in their bigneſs. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now if by this
              <lb/>
            Rule we ſhould find out the quantity of the
              <lb/>
            eighth Sphere, we ſhall diſcern it to be far
              <lb/>
            nearer unto that bigneſs, which Copernicus
              <lb/>
            ſuppoſeth it to have, than that which Pto-
              <lb/>
            lomy, Tycho, and others, ordinarily aſcribe
              <lb/>
            unto it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For the ſtarry Heaven (ſay they)
              <lb/>
            does not finiſh his courſe under 26000 Years;
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">whereas Saturn, which is next unto it, does
              <lb/>
            compaſs his Orb in thirty Years. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From
              <lb/>
            whence it will probably follow, that there is
              <lb/>
            a very great diſtance betwixt theſe in place,
              <lb/>
            becauſe they have ſuch different terms of
              <lb/>
            their Revolutions.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But againſt this Anſwer: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Unto the laſt
              <lb/>
            Argument, our Adverſaries thus reply:</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
        </div>
      </text>
    </echo>