Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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[31. Necnon Oceano paſci phæbumque polumq; Gredimus.]
[32. PROP. IV. That the Moon is a Solid, Compacted, Opacous Body.]
[33. PROP. V. That the Moon hath not any Light of her own.]
[34. PROP. VI. That there is a World in the Moon, bath been the direct Opinion of many Ancient, with ſome Modern Mathematicians, and may probably de deduc’d from the Tenents of others.]
[35. PROP. VII. That thoſe Spots and brighter parts, which by our ſight may be diſtinguiſhed in the Moon, do ſhew the difference betwixt the Sea and Land, in that other World.]
[36. PROP. VIII. The Spots repeſent the Sea, and the brighter parts the Land.]
[37. PROP. IX. That there are high Mountains, deep Vallies, and ſpacious Plains in the Body of the Moon.]
[38. PROP. X. That there is an Atmo-ſphæra, or an Orb of groſs, Vaporous Air, immediately encompaſſing the body of the Moon.]
[39. PROP. XI. That as their World is our Moon, ſo our World is their Moon.]
[40. Provehimur portu, terræque urbeſque recedunt.]
[41. PROP. XII.]
[42. PROP. XIII.]
[43. PROP. XIV.]
[44. FINIS.]
[45. A DISCOURSE Concerning a Rem Planet. Tending to prove That ’tis probable our EARTH is one of the PLANETS. The Second Book. By John Wilkins, late L. Biſhop of Cheſter.]
[46. LONDON: Printed by J. D. for John Gellibrand, at the Golden Ball in St. Paul’s Church-Yard. M.DC.LXXXIV.]
[47. To the Reader.]
[48. PROP. I.]
[49. PROP. II.]
[50. PROP. III.]
[51. PROP. IV.]
[52. PROP. V.]
[53. PROP. VI.]
[54. PROP. VII. PROP. VIII. PROP. IX. PROP. X.]
[55. That the EARTH May be a PLANET. PROP. I.]
[56. PROP. II.]
[57. PROP. III.]
[58. PROP. IV.]
[59. PROP. V. That the Scripture, in its proper conſtru-ction, does not any where affirm the Immobility of the Earth.]
[60. PROP. VI. That there is not any Argument from the Words of Scripture, Principles of Na-ture, or Obſervations in Aſtronomy, which can ſuſſiciently evidence the Earth to be in the Gentre of the Uni-verſe.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
ſelf in effect doth confeſs in another place;
for ſpeaking concerning our knowledge of the
Heavens, he ſays, ’tis very imperfect and diffi-
De cælo. l. 2
cap. 3. 1
cult, by reaſon of the vaſt diſtance of thoſe
Bodies from us, and becauſe the Changes
which may happen unto them, are not either
Big enough, or frequent enough to fall with-
in the Apprehenſion and Obſervation of our
Senſes;
no wonder then if he himſelf be deceiv'd
in his Aſſertions concerning theſe Particulars.
But yet, in this he Implies, that if a Man were
nearer to theſe Heavenly Bodies, he would be
a fitter Judge, to decide this Controverſie than
himſelf.
Now its our Advantage, that by
the help of Galileus his Glaſs, we are advanc'd
nearer unto them, and the Heavens are made
more Preſent to us than they were before.

However, as it is with us where there be ma-
ny Viciſſitudes and Succeſſions or things, tho’
the Earth abideth for ever:
So likewiſe may it
be amongſt the Planets, in which tho’ there
ſhould be divers Alterations, yet they them-
ſelves may ſtill continue of the ſame Quantity
and Light.
2. Though we could not by our Senſes ſe@
ſuch Alterations, yet our Reaſon might per-
haps ſufficiently convince us of them.
Nor
can we well conceive how the Sun ſhould re-
flect againſt the Moon, and yet not produce
ſome Alteration of Heat.
Diogenes the Phi-
loſoper was hence perſwaded, that theſe
Scorching Heats had Burnt the Moon into the
Form of a Pumice ſtone.
3. I anſwer, that there have been ſome Al-
terations obſerv'd there;
Witneſs thoſe Com-

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