Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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[31. Necnon Oceano paſci phæbumque polumq; Gredimus.]
[32. PROP. IV. That the Moon is a Solid, Compacted, Opacous Body.]
[33. PROP. V. That the Moon hath not any Light of her own.]
[34. PROP. VI. That there is a World in the Moon, bath been the direct Opinion of many Ancient, with ſome Modern Mathematicians, and may probably de deduc’d from the Tenents of others.]
[35. PROP. VII. That thoſe Spots and brighter parts, which by our ſight may be diſtinguiſhed in the Moon, do ſhew the difference betwixt the Sea and Land, in that other World.]
[36. PROP. VIII. The Spots repeſent the Sea, and the brighter parts the Land.]
[37. PROP. IX. That there are high Mountains, deep Vallies, and ſpacious Plains in the Body of the Moon.]
[38. PROP. X. That there is an Atmo-ſphæra, or an Orb of groſs, Vaporous Air, immediately encompaſſing the body of the Moon.]
[39. PROP. XI. That as their World is our Moon, ſo our World is their Moon.]
[40. Provehimur portu, terræque urbeſque recedunt.]
[41. PROP. XII.]
[42. PROP. XIII.]
[43. PROP. XIV.]
[44. FINIS.]
[45. A DISCOURSE Concerning a Rem Planet. Tending to prove That ’tis probable our EARTH is one of the PLANETS. The Second Book. By John Wilkins, late L. Biſhop of Cheſter.]
[46. LONDON: Printed by J. D. for John Gellibrand, at the Golden Ball in St. Paul’s Church-Yard. M.DC.LXXXIV.]
[47. To the Reader.]
[48. PROP. I.]
[49. PROP. II.]
[50. PROP. III.]
[51. PROP. IV.]
[52. PROP. V.]
[53. PROP. VI.]
[54. PROP. VII. PROP. VIII. PROP. IX. PROP. X.]
[55. That the EARTH May be a PLANET. PROP. I.]
[56. PROP. II.]
[57. PROP. III.]
[58. PROP. IV.]
[59. PROP. V. That the Scripture, in its proper conſtru-ction, does not any where affirm the Immobility of the Earth.]
[60. PROP. VI. That there is not any Argument from the Words of Scripture, Principles of Na-ture, or Obſervations in Aſtronomy, which can ſuſſiciently evidence the Earth to be in the Gentre of the Uni-verſe.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
other place then wherein it is. But now this
would be ſuch an Inconvenience, as would
quite ſubvert the grounds and whole Art of
Aſtronomy, and therefore is by no means to
be admitted.
Unto this it is commonly Anſwer'd, that
all thoſe Orbs are equally Diaphanus, though
not of a continued quantity.
We reply, that
ſuppoſing they were, yet this cannot hinder
them from being the Cauſes of Refraction,
which is produc'd as well by the Diverſity of
Superſicies, as the different Perſpicuity of Bo-
dies.
Two Glaſſes put together, will cauſe a
divers Refraction from another ſingle one,
that is but of Equal Thickneſs and Perſpicu-
ity.
3. From the different Height or the ſame
Planet at ſeveral times.
For if according to
the uſual Hypotheſis, there ſhould be ſuch di-
ſtinct, Solid Orbs, then it would be impoſſi-
ble that the Planets ſhould intrench upon one
anothers Orbs, or that two of them at ſeveral
Times ſhould be above one another, which
notwithſtanding hath been prov'd to be ſo by
later Experience.
Tycho hath obſerv'd, that
Venus is ſometimes nearer than the Sun or Mer-
cury, and ſometimes farther off than both;
which appearances Regiomontanus himſelf does
Acknowledge, and withal, does confeſs that
they cannot be reconciled to the common Hy-
potheſis.
But for your better Satisſaction herein, I
ſhall refer you to the above nam'd Scheiner,
in his Roſa Urſina, in whom you may ſee both
Authorities and Reaſon, very Largely and

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