Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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[31. Necnon Oceano paſci phæbumque polumq; Gredimus.]
[32. PROP. IV. That the Moon is a Solid, Compacted, Opacous Body.]
[33. PROP. V. That the Moon hath not any Light of her own.]
[34. PROP. VI. That there is a World in the Moon, bath been the direct Opinion of many Ancient, with ſome Modern Mathematicians, and may probably de deduc’d from the Tenents of others.]
[35. PROP. VII. That thoſe Spots and brighter parts, which by our ſight may be diſtinguiſhed in the Moon, do ſhew the difference betwixt the Sea and Land, in that other World.]
[36. PROP. VIII. The Spots repeſent the Sea, and the brighter parts the Land.]
[37. PROP. IX. That there are high Mountains, deep Vallies, and ſpacious Plains in the Body of the Moon.]
[38. PROP. X. That there is an Atmo-ſphæra, or an Orb of groſs, Vaporous Air, immediately encompaſſing the body of the Moon.]
[39. PROP. XI. That as their World is our Moon, ſo our World is their Moon.]
[40. Provehimur portu, terræque urbeſque recedunt.]
[41. PROP. XII.]
[42. PROP. XIII.]
[43. PROP. XIV.]
[44. FINIS.]
[45. A DISCOURSE Concerning a Rem Planet. Tending to prove That ’tis probable our EARTH is one of the PLANETS. The Second Book. By John Wilkins, late L. Biſhop of Cheſter.]
[46. LONDON: Printed by J. D. for John Gellibrand, at the Golden Ball in St. Paul’s Church-Yard. M.DC.LXXXIV.]
[47. To the Reader.]
[48. PROP. I.]
[49. PROP. II.]
[50. PROP. III.]
[51. PROP. IV.]
[52. PROP. V.]
[53. PROP. VI.]
[54. PROP. VII. PROP. VIII. PROP. IX. PROP. X.]
[55. That the EARTH May be a PLANET. PROP. I.]
[56. PROP. II.]
[57. PROP. III.]
[58. PROP. IV.]
[59. PROP. V. That the Scripture, in its proper conſtru-ction, does not any where affirm the Immobility of the Earth.]
[60. PROP. VI. That there is not any Argument from the Words of Scripture, Principles of Na-ture, or Obſervations in Aſtronomy, which can ſuſſiciently evidence the Earth to be in the Gentre of the Uni-verſe.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
to this purpoſe in theſe Words. Ex illâ ali-
menta omnibus animalibus, omnibus ſatis, omnibus
ſtellis dividuntur, hinc proſertur quo fuſtineantur
tot Sidera tam exercitata, tam avida per diem,
noctemque, ut in opere, ita in paſtu.
Speaking
of the Earth, he ſays, from thence it is that
Nouriſhment is divided to all the Living
Creatures, the Plants and the Stars;
hence
were ſuſtain'd ſo many Conſtellations, ſo La-
borious, ſo Greedy, both Day and Night, as
well in their Feeding as Working.
Thus alſo
Lucan Sings,

Necnon Oceano paſci phæbumque polumq;
Gredimus.

Unto theſe Ptolomy alſo, that Learn'd Egyp-
@ Apoſtel.tian, ſeem'd to agree, when he affirms that
the Body of the Moon is moiſter, and cooler
than any of the other Planets, by reaſon of
the Earthly Vapours that are exhaled unto it.
You ſee theſe Ancients thought the Heavens
to be ſo far from this imagined Incorruptibili-
ty, that rather like the weakeſt Bodies they
ſtood in need of ſome continual Nouriſhment,
without which they could not ſubſiſt.
But Ariſtotle and his Followers were ſo far
De Cælo.
l. 1. c. 3.
from this, that they thought thoſe Glorious
Bodies could not contain within them any ſuch
Principles as might make them lyable to the
leaſt Change or Corruption;
and their Chief
Reaſon was, becauſe we could not in ſo long
a ſpace diſcern any alteration amongſt them;
But to this I anſwer.
1. Suppoſing we could not, yet would it
not hence follow that there were none, as he

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