Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="144" file="0324" n="324" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            queſtion here is, not what can be done, but
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            what is moſt likely to be done, according to
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            the uſual courſe of Nature. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis the part
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            of a Philoſopher, in the reſolution of natural
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            Events, not to fly unto the abſolute Power
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            of God, and tell us what he can do, but
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            what, according to the uſual way of Provi-
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            dence, is moſt likely to be done, to find out
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            ſuch cauſes of things, as may ſeem moſt eaſy
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            and probable to our reaſon.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">If you ask, What repugnancy there is in
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            the Heavens, unto ſo great a ſwiftneſs? </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">We
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            anſwer; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Their being ſuch vaſt, material
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            condenſed Subſtances, with which this in-
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            conceivable Motion cannot agree.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">Since Motion and Magnitude are two ſuch
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            Geometrical things, as bear a mutual pro-
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            portion to one another; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">therefore it may
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            ſeem convenient, that ſlowneſs ſhould be
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            more agreeable to a great Body, and ſwift-
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            neſs to a leſſer : </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and ſo it would be more
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            conſonant to the Principles of Nature, that
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            the Earth, which is of a leſſer quantity,
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            ſhould be appointed to ſuch a Motion, as is
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            ſomewhat proportionable to its bigneſs,
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            than that the Heavens, that are of ſuch a
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            vaſt magnitude, ſhould be whirled about
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            with ſuch an incredible ſwiftneſs, which
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            does ſo far exceed the proportion of their
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            bigneſs, as their bigneſs does exceed this
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            Earth, that is but as a Point or Centre to
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            them. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis not likely that Nature, in theſe
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            conſtant and great Works, ſhould ſo much
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            deviate from that uſual Harmony and Pro-</s>
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