Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="166" file="0346" n="346" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            the Sun at A, in the four chief Points of
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            the Zodiack; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">namely, the two Equinoctials
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            at ♈ and ♎, and the Solſtices at ♑ and ♋.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Through all which Points, the Earth does
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            paſs in its Annual Motion, from Weſt to
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            Eaſt.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The Axis, upon which our Earth does
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            move, is repreſented by the Line BC;
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">which Axis does always decline from that of
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            the Ecliptick, about 23 degres, 30 minutes. </s>
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            The Points BC, are imagined to be the Poles,
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            B the North Pole, and C the South.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">Now if we ſuppoſe this Earth to turn a-
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            bout its own Axis, by a Diurnal Motion,
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            then every Point of it will deſcribe a Paral-
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            lel Circle, which will be either bigger or
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            leſſer, according to its diſtance from the
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            Poles. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The chief of them are the Equino-
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            ctial DE. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The two Tropicks, FG, and HI.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The two Polar Circles, MN the Artick,
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            and KL the Antartick: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">of which, the Equi-
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            noctial only is a great Circle, and therefore
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            will always be equally divided by the Line of
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            Illumination, ML; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">whereas the other Pa-
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            rallels are thereby diſtributed into unequal
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            parts. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Amongſt which parts, the Diurnal
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            Arches of thoſe that are towards B, the
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            North Pole, are bigger than the Nocturnal,
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            when our Earth is in ♑, and the Sun appears
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            in ♋. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Inſomuch, that the whole Artick Cir-
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            cle is enlightned, and there is day for half a
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            Year together under that Pole.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">Now when the Earth proceeds to the other
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            Solſtice at ♋, and the Sun appears in ♑, then</s>
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