Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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[41. PROP. XII.]
[42. PROP. XIII.]
[43. PROP. XIV.]
[44. FINIS.]
[45. A DISCOURSE Concerning a Rem Planet. Tending to prove That ’tis probable our EARTH is one of the PLANETS. The Second Book. By John Wilkins, late L. Biſhop of Cheſter.]
[46. LONDON: Printed by J. D. for John Gellibrand, at the Golden Ball in St. Paul’s Church-Yard. M.DC.LXXXIV.]
[47. To the Reader.]
[48. PROP. I.]
[49. PROP. II.]
[50. PROP. III.]
[51. PROP. IV.]
[52. PROP. V.]
[53. PROP. VI.]
[54. PROP. VII. PROP. VIII. PROP. IX. PROP. X.]
[55. That the EARTH May be a PLANET. PROP. I.]
[56. PROP. II.]
[57. PROP. III.]
[58. PROP. IV.]
[59. PROP. V. That the Scripture, in its proper conſtru-ction, does not any where affirm the Immobility of the Earth.]
[60. PROP. VI. That there is not any Argument from the Words of Scripture, Principles of Na-ture, or Obſervations in Aſtronomy, which can ſuſſiciently evidence the Earth to be in the Gentre of the Uni-verſe.]
[61. PROP. VII. Tis probable that the Sun is in the Gentre of the World.]
[62. PROP. VIII. That there is not any ſufficient reaſon to prove the Earth incapable of thoſe mo-tions which Copernicus aſcribes un-to it.]
[63. Provebimur portu, terræque, verbeſq; recedunt.]
[64. PROP. IX. That it is more probable the Earth does move, than the Sun or Heavens.]
[65. PROP. X. That this Hypotheſis is exactly agreeable to common appearances.]
[66. Quicunq; ſolam mente præcipiti petit]
[67. Brevem replere non valentis ambitum, # Pudebit aucti nominis.]
[68. FINIS.]
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That the Earth may be a Planet.
proving of a God, and making Men reli-
gious;
ſo likewiſe may it ſerve to confirm
unto us the Truth of the Holy Scriptures;
ſince the Sacred Story, in the order of its
Narrations, does ſo exactly agree with the
Converſions of Heaven, and Logiſtical Aſtro-
nomy.
It may alſo ſtir us up to behave our ſelves
anſwerably, unto the noble and divine Na-
ture of our Souls.
When I conſider the Hea-
ven, the Works of thy Fingers;
the Moon and
the Stars which thou haſt ordained:
What is
Pſal.8. 3,6Man, that thou art ſo mindful of him?
as to
create ſuch vaſt glorious Bodies for his Ser-
vice.
Again, when I conſider with my ſelf, the
ſtrange immenſity and bigneſs of this great
Univerſe;
in compariſon to which, this Earth
of ours, is but as an undiſcernable Point:
When I conſider that I carry a Soul about
me, of a far greater worth than all this,
and Deſires that are of a wider extent, and
more unbounded capacity, than this whole
Frame of Nature;
then me-thinks it muſt
needs argue a degenerateneſs and poverty
of Spirit, to buſy my Faculties about ſo
ignoble, narrow a Subject, as any of theſe
earthly things.
What a folly is it in Men to have ſuch
high conceits of themſelves, for ſome ſmall
Poſſeſſions which they have in the World
above others, to keep ſo great a busſle
about ſo poor a Matter.
Hoc eſt punctum

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