Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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[41. PROP. XII.]
[42. PROP. XIII.]
[43. PROP. XIV.]
[44. FINIS.]
[45. A DISCOURSE Concerning a Rem Planet. Tending to prove That ’tis probable our EARTH is one of the PLANETS. The Second Book. By John Wilkins, late L. Biſhop of Cheſter.]
[46. LONDON: Printed by J. D. for John Gellibrand, at the Golden Ball in St. Paul’s Church-Yard. M.DC.LXXXIV.]
[47. To the Reader.]
[48. PROP. I.]
[49. PROP. II.]
[50. PROP. III.]
[51. PROP. IV.]
[52. PROP. V.]
[53. PROP. VI.]
[54. PROP. VII. PROP. VIII. PROP. IX. PROP. X.]
[55. That the EARTH May be a PLANET. PROP. I.]
[56. PROP. II.]
[57. PROP. III.]
[58. PROP. IV.]
[59. PROP. V. That the Scripture, in its proper conſtru-ction, does not any where affirm the Immobility of the Earth.]
[60. PROP. VI. That there is not any Argument from the Words of Scripture, Principles of Na-ture, or Obſervations in Aſtronomy, which can ſuſſiciently evidence the Earth to be in the Gentre of the Uni-verſe.]
[61. PROP. VII. Tis probable that the Sun is in the Gentre of the World.]
[62. PROP. VIII. That there is not any ſufficient reaſon to prove the Earth incapable of thoſe mo-tions which Copernicus aſcribes un-to it.]
[63. Provebimur portu, terræque, verbeſq; recedunt.]
[64. PROP. IX. That it is more probable the Earth does move, than the Sun or Heavens.]
[65. PROP. X. That this Hypotheſis is exactly agreeable to common appearances.]
[66. Quicunq; ſolam mente præcipiti petit]
[67. Brevem replere non valentis ambitum, # Pudebit aucti nominis.]
[68. FINIS.]
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That the Earth may be a Planet.

PROP. VIII.

That there is not any ſufficient reaſon to
prove the Earth incapable of thoſe mo-
tions which Copernicus aſcribes un-
to it.

THe two chief Motions in the World,
which are more eſpecially remarkable
above the reſt, are the Diurnal, and An-
nual.
The Diurnal, which makes the difference
betwixt Night and Day, is cauſed by the
Revolution of our Earth upon its own Axis,
in the ſpace of four and twenty hours.
The Annual, which makes the difference
betwixt Winter and Summer, is likewiſe
cauſed by the Earth, when being carried
through the Ecliptick in its own Orb, it ſi-
niſhes its courſe in a Year.
The firſt is uſually ſtiled, Motus Revolu-
tionis :
The ſecond, Motus Circumlationis :
There is likewiſe a third, which Copernicus
calls, Motus Inclinationis:
But this being
throughly conſidered, cannot properly be
ſtiled a Motion, but rather an Immutability,
it being that whereby the Axis of the Earth
does always keep parallel to it ſelf;
from
which ſcituation, it is not its Annual Courſe
that does make it in the leaſt manner to de-
cline.

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