Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Table of contents

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[41. PROP. XII.]
[42. PROP. XIII.]
[43. PROP. XIV.]
[44. FINIS.]
[45. A DISCOURSE Concerning a Rem Planet. Tending to prove That ’tis probable our EARTH is one of the PLANETS. The Second Book. By John Wilkins, late L. Biſhop of Cheſter.]
[46. LONDON: Printed by J. D. for John Gellibrand, at the Golden Ball in St. Paul’s Church-Yard. M.DC.LXXXIV.]
[47. To the Reader.]
[48. PROP. I.]
[49. PROP. II.]
[50. PROP. III.]
[51. PROP. IV.]
[52. PROP. V.]
[53. PROP. VI.]
[54. PROP. VII. PROP. VIII. PROP. IX. PROP. X.]
[55. That the EARTH May be a PLANET. PROP. I.]
[56. PROP. II.]
[57. PROP. III.]
[58. PROP. IV.]
[59. PROP. V. That the Scripture, in its proper conſtru-ction, does not any where affirm the Immobility of the Earth.]
[60. PROP. VI. That there is not any Argument from the Words of Scripture, Principles of Na-ture, or Obſervations in Aſtronomy, which can ſuſſiciently evidence the Earth to be in the Gentre of the Uni-verſe.]
[61. PROP. VII. Tis probable that the Sun is in the Gentre of the World.]
[62. PROP. VIII. That there is not any ſufficient reaſon to prove the Earth incapable of thoſe mo-tions which Copernicus aſcribes un-to it.]
[63. Provebimur portu, terræque, verbeſq; recedunt.]
[64. PROP. IX. That it is more probable the Earth does move, than the Sun or Heavens.]
[65. PROP. X. That this Hypotheſis is exactly agreeable to common appearances.]
[66. Quicunq; ſolam mente præcipiti petit]
[67. Brevem replere non valentis ambitum, # Pudebit aucti nominis.]
[68. FINIS.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
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            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="98" file="0110" n="110" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            No; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſince ’tis ſo, and more with us alſo under
              <lb/>
            the Poles; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and beſides, the general Length of
              <lb/>
            their Night is ſomewhat abated in the Bigneſs
              <lb/>
            of their Moon which is our Earth. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For this Re-
              <lb/>
            turns as great a Light unto that Planet, as it
              <lb/>
            Receives from it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But for the better Proof of
              <lb/>
            this, I ſhall firſt free the Way from ſuch Opi-
              <lb/>
            nions as might otherwiſe hinder the ſpeed of a
              <lb/>
            clearer Progreſs.</s>
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            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0109-01" xlink:href="note-0109-01a" xml:space="preserve">De gen.
              <lb/>
            animal. l. 4.
              <lb/>
            21.</note>
            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0109-02" xlink:href="note-0109-02a" xml:space="preserve">Golden
              <lb/>
            Number.</note>
          </div>
          <note position="left" xml:space="preserve">Plut de.
            <lb/>
          fac lunæ.</note>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Plutarch, one of the chief Patrons of this
              <lb/>
            World in the Moon, doth directly Contract
              <lb/>
            this Propoſition, Affirming, that thoſe who
              <lb/>
            Live there, may diſcern our World, as the
              <lb/>
            Dreggs and Sediment of all other Creatures,
              <lb/>
            appearing to them through Clouds and Foggy
              <lb/>
            miſts, and that altogether Devoid of Light,
              <lb/>
            being Baſe and unmoveable; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo that they
              <lb/>
            might well imagine the Dark place of Damna-
              <lb/>
            tion to be here Situate, and that they only were
              <lb/>
            the Inhabiters of the World, as being in the
              <lb/>
            midſt betwixt Heaven and Hell.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">To this I may Anſwer, ’tis Probable that
              <lb/>
            Plutarch ſpake this Inconſiderately, and with-
              <lb/>
            out a Reaſon, which makes him likewife fall
              <lb/>
            into another Abſurdity, when he ſays our Earth
              <lb/>
            would appear Immovable; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">whereas Queſtion-
              <lb/>
            leſs, though it did not, yet would it ſeem to
              <lb/>
            Move and theirs to ſtand Still, as the Land doth
              <lb/>
            to a Man in a Ship; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">according to that of the
              <lb/>
            Poet.</s>
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        <div type="section" level="1" n="40">
          <head style="it" xml:space="preserve">Provehimur portu, terræque urbeſque recedunt.</head>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And I doubt not but that the Ingenious Au-
              <lb/>
            thor would eaſily have Recanted, if he
              <lb/>
            had been but acquainted with thoſe Expe-</s>
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