Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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[51. PROP. IV.]
[52. PROP. V.]
[53. PROP. VI.]
[54. PROP. VII. PROP. VIII. PROP. IX. PROP. X.]
[55. That the EARTH May be a PLANET. PROP. I.]
[56. PROP. II.]
[57. PROP. III.]
[58. PROP. IV.]
[59. PROP. V. That the Scripture, in its proper conſtru-ction, does not any where affirm the Immobility of the Earth.]
[60. PROP. VI. That there is not any Argument from the Words of Scripture, Principles of Na-ture, or Obſervations in Aſtronomy, which can ſuſſiciently evidence the Earth to be in the Gentre of the Uni-verſe.]
[61. PROP. VII. Tis probable that the Sun is in the Gentre of the World.]
[62. PROP. VIII. That there is not any ſufficient reaſon to prove the Earth incapable of thoſe mo-tions which Copernicus aſcribes un-to it.]
[63. Provebimur portu, terræque, verbeſq; recedunt.]
[64. PROP. IX. That it is more probable the Earth does move, than the Sun or Heavens.]
[65. PROP. X. That this Hypotheſis is exactly agreeable to common appearances.]
[66. Quicunq; ſolam mente præcipiti petit]
[67. Brevem replere non valentis ambitum, # Pudebit aucti nominis.]
[68. FINIS.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
ſider how any Rugged Body would appear, be-
ing enlightned, you would eaſily conceive that
it muſt neceſſarily ſeem under ſome ſuch Gib-
bous unequal form, as the Moon is here repre-
ſented.
Now for the Infallibility of theſe ap-
pearances, I ſhall refer the Reader to that which
hath been ſaid in the Sixth Propoſition.
But Gæſar la Galla affirms, that all theſe
appearances may conſiſt with a plainSuperficies,
if we ſuppoſe the parts of the Body to be ſome
of them Diaphanous, and ſome Opacous;
and
if you Object, that the Light which is convey'd
to any Diaphanous part in a plain Superficies,
muſt be by a continued Line, whereas here there
appear many brighter parts among the Obſcure
at ſome diſtance from the reſt.
To this he
anſwers, it may ariſe from ſome Secret Con-
veyances and Channels within her Body, that
do conſiſt of a more Diaphanous matter, which
being covered over with an Opacous Superfi-
cies, the Light paſſing through them, may break
out a great way off;
whereas the other parts
betwixt, may ſtill remain Dark.
Juſt as the
River Aretbuſa in Sicily, which runs under
ground for a great way, and afterwards breaks
out again.
But becauſe this is one of the cheifeſt
Fancies, whereby he thinks he hath fully an-
ſwered the Argument of this Opininion;
I will
therefore ſet down his anſwer in his own words
leſt the Reader might ſuſpect more in them,
than I have expreſſed.
Non eſt impoſſible cæcos
cap. II.ductus diaphani &
perſpicui corporis, ſed opacd
ſuperficie protendi, uſque in diapbanam aliquam ex
profundoin ſuperficiem emergentem partem, per quos
ductus lume inlongo poſt modum interſticio erumpat,

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