Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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[51. PROP. IV.]
[52. PROP. V.]
[53. PROP. VI.]
[54. PROP. VII. PROP. VIII. PROP. IX. PROP. X.]
[55. That the EARTH May be a PLANET. PROP. I.]
[56. PROP. II.]
[57. PROP. III.]
[58. PROP. IV.]
[59. PROP. V. That the Scripture, in its proper conſtru-ction, does not any where affirm the Immobility of the Earth.]
[60. PROP. VI. That there is not any Argument from the Words of Scripture, Principles of Na-ture, or Obſervations in Aſtronomy, which can ſuſſiciently evidence the Earth to be in the Gentre of the Uni-verſe.]
[61. PROP. VII. Tis probable that the Sun is in the Gentre of the World.]
[62. PROP. VIII. That there is not any ſufficient reaſon to prove the Earth incapable of thoſe mo-tions which Copernicus aſcribes un-to it.]
[63. Provebimur portu, terræque, verbeſq; recedunt.]
[64. PROP. IX. That it is more probable the Earth does move, than the Sun or Heavens.]
[65. PROP. X. That this Hypotheſis is exactly agreeable to common appearances.]
[66. Quicunq; ſolam mente præcipiti petit]
[67. Brevem replere non valentis ambitum, # Pudebit aucti nominis.]
[68. FINIS.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
fore in another place he calls it a Terreſtrial
Star, and an Olympian and Celeſtial Earth;
anſwerable, as I conceive, to the Paradiſe of
the School-Men.
And, that Paradiſe was ei-
ther in, or near the Moon, is the Opinion of
ſome later Writers, who deriv’d it in all like-
lyhood, from the Aſſertion of Plato, and per-
haps this of Plutarch.
Toſtatus lays this Opini-
on upon Iſiodor, Hiſpalenſis, and the Venerable
SirW. Raw.
l.1.c. 3 ſect.
7.
In geneſ.
Bede;
and Pererius Fathers it upon Strabus and
Rabanus his Maſter.
Some would have it to
be ſituated in ſuch a place as could not be diſ-
cover’d, which caus’d the Pen-man of Eſdras
to make it a harder matter to know the out-go-
ings of Paradiſe, than to weigh the weight of the
Fire, or meaſure the blaſts of the Wind, or call
2 Eſdr.4.7.again a day that is paſt.
But notwithſtanding
this, there be ſome others, who think, that it
is on the Top of ſome high Mountain under
the Line;
and theſe interpreted the Torrid
Zone to be the flaming Sword whereby Para-
diſe was guarded.
’Tis the conſent of divers
others, that Paradiſe is ſituated in ſome high &

eminent place.
So Toſtatus, Eſt etiam Paradiſus ſi-
tu altiſſima, ſupra omnem terræ altitudinem.
’Pa-
‘radiſe is ſituated in ſome high place above
‘the Earth;
and therefore in his Comment up-
on the 49 of Geneſis, he underſtands the Bleſ-
In Genef.ſing of Jacob, concerning the everlaſting Hills
to be meant of Paradiſe, and the Bleſſing it
ſelf to be nothing elſe but a Promiſe of Chriſts
coming, by whoſe Paſſion the Gates of Para-
diſe ſhould be opened.
Unto him aſſented
Rupertus, Scotus, and moſt of the other School-
Men, as I find them cited by Pererius, and out

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