Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Table of contents

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[51. PROP. IV.]
[52. PROP. V.]
[53. PROP. VI.]
[54. PROP. VII. PROP. VIII. PROP. IX. PROP. X.]
[55. That the EARTH May be a PLANET. PROP. I.]
[56. PROP. II.]
[57. PROP. III.]
[58. PROP. IV.]
[59. PROP. V. That the Scripture, in its proper conſtru-ction, does not any where affirm the Immobility of the Earth.]
[60. PROP. VI. That there is not any Argument from the Words of Scripture, Principles of Na-ture, or Obſervations in Aſtronomy, which can ſuſſiciently evidence the Earth to be in the Gentre of the Uni-verſe.]
[61. PROP. VII. Tis probable that the Sun is in the Gentre of the World.]
[62. PROP. VIII. That there is not any ſufficient reaſon to prove the Earth incapable of thoſe mo-tions which Copernicus aſcribes un-to it.]
[63. Provebimur portu, terræque, verbeſq; recedunt.]
[64. PROP. IX. That it is more probable the Earth does move, than the Sun or Heavens.]
[65. PROP. X. That this Hypotheſis is exactly agreeable to common appearances.]
[66. Quicunq; ſolam mente præcipiti petit]
[67. Brevem replere non valentis ambitum, # Pudebit aucti nominis.]
[68. FINIS.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="33" file="0045" n="45" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            Saint Baſil did endeavour to prove this out of
              <lb/>
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            that place in Iſaiab, where they are compar'd
              <lb/>
            to Smoak, as they are both quoted by Rhodi-
              <lb/>
            ginus. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Euſebius Nicrembergius doth likewiſe
              <lb/>
            from that place confute the Solidity and In-
              <lb/>
            corruptibility of the Heavens, and cites for
              <lb/>
            the ſame Interpretation the Authority of Eu-
              <lb/>
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            ſtachius of Antioch; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and St. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Auſtin, I am ſure,
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            in one place ſeems to aſſent unto this Opinion,
              <lb/>
            though he does oſten in his other Works con-
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            tradict it.</s>
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            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0045-01" xlink:href="note-0045-01a" xml:space="preserve">Iſa. 51. 6.
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            Ant. lect.
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            l. 1. c. 4.
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            Hiſt. nat.
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            l. 2. c.11.13.</note>
            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0045-02" xlink:href="note-0045-02a" xml:space="preserve">In lib. ſup.
              <lb/>
            Gen. ad lit.</note>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If you eſteem the Teſtimony of the Ancient
              <lb/>
            Fathers, to be of any great Force or Conſe-
              <lb/>
            quence in a Philoſophical Diſpute, you may
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            ſee them to this Purpoſe in Sixtus Senenſis lib.
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">5. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Biblioth. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">annot. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">14. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The chief Reaſons,
              <lb/>
            that are commonly urg'd for the Confirmati-
              <lb/>
            on of it, are briefly theſe Three.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From the Altitude of divers Comets,
              <lb/>
            which have been obſerv'd to be above the
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            Planets, through whoſe Orbs (if they had
              <lb/>
            been Solid, there would not have been any
              <lb/>
            Paſſage. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">To theſe may be added thoſe leſſer
              <lb/>
            Planets lately diſcover'd about Fupiter and
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            Saturn, for which Aſtronomers have not yet
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            fram'd any Orbs.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From that uncertainty of all Aſtronomi-
              <lb/>
            cal Obſervations, which will follow upon the
              <lb/>
            Suppoſition of ſuch Solid Spheres. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For then
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            we ſhould never diſcern any Star but by a mul-
              <lb/>
            titude of Refractions, and ſo conſequently we
              <lb/>
            would not poſſibly find their true Scituations
              <lb/>
            either in reſpect of us, or in regard of one ano-
              <lb/>
            ther; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſince whatever the Eye diſcerns by a
              <lb/>
            Refracted Beam, it apprehends to be in ſome</s>
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