Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="97" file="0109" n="109" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            Ariſtotle uſes in in his Book de Mundo, and
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            ſhew'd you the neceſſary parts that belong to
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            this World in the Moon. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">In the next place
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            ’tis requiſite that I proceed to thoſe things
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            which are Extrinſecal unto it, as the Seaſons, the
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            Meteors, and the Inhabitants.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Of the Seaſons;</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">And if there be ſuch a World in the Moon,
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            ’tis requiſite then that their Seaſons ſhould be
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            ſome way Correſpondent unto ours, that they
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            ſhould have Winter and Summer, Night and
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            Day, as we have.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">Now that in this Planet there is ſome Si-
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            militude of Winter and Summer, is affirmed
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            by Ariſtotle himſelf, ſince there is one Hemiſ-
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            phere that hath always Heat and Light, and
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            the other that hath Darkneſs and Cold. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">True
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            indeed, their Days and Years are always
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            of one and the ſame Length (unleſs we make
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            one of their Years to be 19 of ours, in which
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            ſpace all the Stars do Ariſe after the ſame Or-
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            der.) </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But ’tis ſo with us alſo under the Poles,
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            and therefore that great difference is not Suf-
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            ficient to make it altogether unlike ours; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">nor
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            can we expect that every thing there ſhould be
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            in the ſame manner as it is here below, as if
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            Nature had no way but one to bring about her
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            Purpoſe. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">We have no Reaſon then to think
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            it neceſſary that both theſe Worlds ſhould be
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            altogether alike, but it may ſuffice if they be
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            Coreſpondent in ſomething only. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">However, it
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            may be queſtioned whether it doth not ſeem to
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            be againſt the Wiſdom of Providence, to make
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            the Night of ſo great a Length, when they have
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            ſuch a long time unfit for Work? </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I Anſwer,</s>
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