Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="80" file="0092" n="92" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            for having immmediately before mentioned
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            thoſe Bleſſings which ſhould happen unto Fo-
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            ſeph by the Influence of the Moon, he does pre-
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            ſently exegetically iterate them in Bleſſing him
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            with the chief things in the ancient Mountains
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            and laſting Hills; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">you may alſo ſee the ſame
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            expreſſion uſed in Jacobs Bleſſing of Joſeph.
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0092-01a" xlink:href="note-0092-01"/>
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            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0092-01" xlink:href="note-0092-01a" xml:space="preserve">Gen. 49. 26. </note>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">But however we may deal pro or con in Phi-
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            loſophy, yet we muſt not be too bold with Di-
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            vine Truths, or bring Scripture to Patronize
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            any Fancy of our own, though perhaps it be
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            Truth. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I am not of their Mind who think it
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            a good Courſe to confirm Philoſophical Se-
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            crets from the letter of the Scripture, or by a-
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            buſing ſome obſcure Text in it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Methinks it
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            ſavors too much of that melancholly humour
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            of the Chymicks, who, aiming in all their Stu-
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            dies at the making of Gold, do perſwade them-
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            ſelves, that the moſt learned and ſubtile of the
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            Ancient Authors, in all their obſcure places,
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            do mean ſome ſuch ſenſe as may make
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            to their purpoſe. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And hence it is that they
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            derive ſuch ſtrange Myſteries from the Fables
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            of the Poets, and can tell you what great ſecret
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            it was that Antiquity did hide under the Ficti-
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            on of Jupiter being turned into a Showre of
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            Gold: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">of Mercury's being made the Interpre-
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            ter of the Gods: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">of the Moons deſcending to
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            the Earth for the Love of Endymion: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">with
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            ſuch ridiculous Interpretations of theſe and the
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            like Fables, which any reaſonable conſidering
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            Man cannot conceive to proceed from any,
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            but ſuch as are diſtracted. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">No leſs Fantaſtical
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            in this kind are the Jewiſh Rabbies, amongſt
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            whom is not any Opinion, whether in Nature or</s>
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