Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="103" file="0115" n="115" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            the ſame Darkneſs from the Eclipſes, being
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            alſo ſeverally helped by one another in their
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            greateſt wants: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For when the Moon is in
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            Conjunction with the Sun, and her upper part
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            receives all the Light, then her lower Hemi-
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            ſphere (which would otherwiſe be altogether
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            dark) is enlightned by the Reſlexion of the
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            Sun-Beams from the Earth. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">When theſe two
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            Planets are in Oppoſition, then that part of the
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            Earth which could not receive any Light from
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            the Sun-Beams, is moſt Enlightned by the
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            Moon, being then in the Full; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and as ſhe doth
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            moſt Illuminate the Earth when the Sun-Beams
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            cannot, ſo the grateful Earth returns to her as
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            great (nay greater) Light when ſhe moſt wants
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            it; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo that always that viſible part of the Moon
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            which receives nothing from the Sun, is en-
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            lightned by the Earth, as is prov’d by Galiæ-
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            us, with many more Arguments in that Trea-
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            tiſe which he calls Syſtema mundi. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">True in-
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            deed, when the Moon comes to a quartile,
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            then you can neither diſcern this Light, nor
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            yet the darker part of her Body, and that for
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            a double Reaſon.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Becauſe the nearer it comes to the Full,
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            the leſs Light does it receive from the Earth,
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            whoſe Illumination does always decreaſe in
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            the ſame Proportion as the Moon does In-
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            creaſe.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Becauſe of the Exuperancy of the Light
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            in the other parts. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Quippe illuſtratum medium
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            ſpeciem recipit valentiorem, the clearer bright-
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            neſs involves the Sight, as it is with thoſe of
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            Sound; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and as the greater Noiſe drowns the
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            leſs, ſo the brighter Objecthides that which is</s>
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