Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Eartb may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="94" file="0274" n="274" rhead="That the Eartb may be a Planet."/>
            authority of others,
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            Keplar tells us, from
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            the experience of skilful Men, that the bet-
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            ter the Perſpective is, by ſo much the lefs
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            will the fixed Stars appear through it, being
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            but as meer Points from which the Beams of
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            Light do diſperſe themſelves like Hairs. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And
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            ’tis commonly affirmed by others, that the
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            Dog-ſtar, which ſeems to be the biggeſt
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            Star amongſt thoſe of the firſt Magnitude,
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            does yet appear through this Glaſs, but as a
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            little Point no bigger than the fiftieth part
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            of Jupiter. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Hence it is, that though the
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            common Opinion hold the Stars of the firſt
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            Magnitude to be two Minutes in their Dia-
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            meter, and Tycho three; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet
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            Gallilæus,
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            who had been moſt verſed in the Experi-
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            ments of his own Perſpective, concludes them
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            to be but five Seconds.</s>
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            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0274-01" xlink:href="note-0274-01a" xml:space="preserve">* Aſtron.
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            Copern.
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            l.I. par.I.</note>
            <note symbol="" position="left" xlink:label="note-0274-02" xlink:href="note-0274-02a" xml:space="preserve">Syſtem.
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            mundi,
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            Coll.3.</note>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">To the ſecond: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Firſt, we affirm the
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            fixed Stars to be of a vaſt Magnitude. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But
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            however, this Argument does not induce any
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            neceſſity that we ſhould conceive them ſo big
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            as the Earth's Orb. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For it might eaſily be
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            proved, that though a Star of the ſixth Mag-
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            nitude, were but equal in Diameter unto
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            the Sun, (which is far enough from the
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            greatneſs of the Earth's Orb) yet the
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            ftarry Heaven would be at ſuch a diſtance
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            from us, that the Earth's annual Motion
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            could not cauſe any difference in its appear-
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            ance.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Suppoſe the Diameter of the Sun to be a-
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0274-03a" xlink:href="note-0274-03"/>
            bout half a Degree, as our Adverſaries
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            grant; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">whereas a Star of the ſixth Magni-</s>
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