Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="70" file="0082" n="82" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            therefore the Beams muſt Sink into it, and can-
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            not ſo ſtrongly and clearly be reflected. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Sicut
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            in ſpeculo ubi plumbum abr aſum fuerit, ſaith Gar-
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            dan, as in Looking-glaſſes where part of the
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            Lead is raſed off, and nothing left behind to
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            Reverberate the Image, the ſpecies muſt there
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            paſs through, and not back again; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo it is
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            where the Beams penetrate and ſink into the
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            ſubſtance of the Body, there cannot be ſuch an
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            immediate and ſtrong Reflexion, as when they
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            are beat back from the Superficies, and there-
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            fore the Sun cauſes a greater Heat by far upon
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            the Land than upon the Water. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now as for
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            that Experiment where it is ſaid, that the wa-
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            ters have a greater brightneſs than the Land:
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I anſwer, ’tis true only there where they re-
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            preſent the Image of the Sun or ſome bright
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            Cloud, and not in other places, eſpecially if
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            we look upon them at any great diſtance, as is
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            very plain by common Obſervation.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">And ’tis certain, that from any high Moun-
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            tain the Land does appear a great deal brighter
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            than any Lake or River.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">This may yet further be illuſtrated by the
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            ſimilitude of a Looking-glaſs hanging upon a
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            Wall in the Sun-ſhine, where, if the Eye be
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            not placed in the juſt line of Reflexion from
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            the Glaſs, ’tis manifeſt that the Wall will be
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            of a brighter appearance than the Glaſs. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">True
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            indeed in the Line of Reflexion, the Light of
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            the Glaſs is equal almoſt unto that which comes
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            immediately from the Sun it ſelf; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but now
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            this is only in one particular place, and ſo is
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            not like that Brightneſs which we diſcern in
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            the Moon, becauſe this does appear equally</s>
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