Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="111" file="0123" n="123" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            neſs, whereas then he could only ſee ſome
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            ſmall parts of it; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but how much Brighter
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            would it have appeared if he might in a direct
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            Line behold the whole Globe of Earth, and
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            theſe Rays gathered together? </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So that if we
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            Conſider that great Light which the Earth re-
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            ceives from the Sun in the Summer, and then
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            Supoſe we were in the Moon, where we might
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            ſee the whole Earth hanging in thoſe vaſt
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            Spaces, where there is nothing to Terminate
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            the Sight, but thoſe Beams which are there
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            Contracted into a little Compaſs; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I ſay, if we
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            do well Conſider this, we may eaſily Conceive
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            that our Earth appears as Bright to thoſe
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            other Inhabitants in the Moon, as their doth
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            to us.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But here it may be Objected, that with us,
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            for many Days in the Year, the Heavens are ſo
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            overclouded, that we cannot ſee the Sun at
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            all, and for the moſt part, in our brighteſt
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            Days, there are many ſcattered Clouds, which
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            ſhade the Earth in ſundry Places; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo that in
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            this Reſpect, it muſt needs be unlike the
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            Moon and will not be able to yeild ſo clear,
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            unintermited a Light, as it Receives from that
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            Planet;</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">To this I Anſwer.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">As for thoſe leſſer brighter Clouds
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            which for the moſt part are Scattered up and
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            down in the cleareſt Days, theſe can be no
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            Reaſon why our Earth ſhould be of a Darker
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            appearance, becauſe theſeClouds being near un-
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            to the Earth, and ſo not Diſtinguiſhable at ſo
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            great a Diſtance from it, and likewiſe being
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            Illuminated on their back Parts by the Sun</s>
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