Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="120" file="0132" n="132" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            lar Opinion; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but it ſeemed moſt likely to
              <lb/>
            Gamillus Glorioſus. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Th. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Gampanella, Fromondus,
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0132-01a" xlink:href="note-0132-01"/>
            with ſome others. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But if you ask, whither
              <lb/>
            ſhall all theſe Exhalations return? </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I Anſwer,
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            every one into his own Planet. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If it be again
              <lb/>
            Objected, that then there will be ſo many
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            Centers of Gravity, and each ſeveral Planet
              <lb/>
            will be a diſtinct World; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I reply, we have not
              <lb/>
            like probability concerning the reſt; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but yet,
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            perhaps all of them are ſo, except the Sun, tho
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            Guſanus, & </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſome others, think, there is one alſo;
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0132-02a" xlink:href="note-0132-02"/>
            and later times have diſcovered ſome leſſer
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            Clouds moving round about him. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But as for
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            Saturn he hath two Moons on each ſide. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Fupiter
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            hath four, that Incircle him with their Motion,
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            which are likewiſe Eclipſed by the Interpoſiti-
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            on of his Body, as the Moon is of our Earth.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Venus is obſerv’d to increaſe and decreaſe as
              <lb/>
            the Moon. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And this perhaps hath been noted
              <lb/>
            by former Ages, as may be gueſt by that Re-
              <lb/>
            lation of St. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Auſtin out of Varro. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Mars
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0132-03a" xlink:href="note-0132-03"/>
            and all the reſt, derive their Light from the
              <lb/>
            the Sun. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Concerning Mercury, there hath
              <lb/>
            been little or no Obſervation, becauſe, for the
              <lb/>
            moſt part, he lies hid under the Sun-Beams,
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            and ſeldom appears by himſelf. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But when he
              <lb/>
            does, yet the compaſs of his Body is ſo little,
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            and his Light of ſo clear a brightneſs, by rea-
              <lb/>
            ſon of his nearneſs to the Sun, that the Per-
              <lb/>
            ſpective cannot make the ſame Diſcoveries
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            upon him, as from the reſt.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <div type="float" level="2" n="5">
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0132-01" xlink:href="note-0132-01a" xml:space="preserve">De Comet.
              <lb/>
            l. 5. c. 4.
              <lb/>
            Apol. pro
              <lb/>
            Galil.
              <lb/>
            Meteor. l.
              <lb/>
            3.c.2.Art. 6.</note>
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0132-02" xlink:href="note-0132-02a" xml:space="preserve">Lectant.
              <lb/>
            Fuſt. l.3. c.
              <lb/>
            23.</note>
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0132-03" xlink:href="note-0132-03a" xml:space="preserve">De Civit.
              <lb/>
            Dei. l. 21.
              <lb/>
            cap. 8.</note>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So that if you conſider their Quantity, their
              <lb/>
            Opacity, or theſe other Diſcoveries, you ſhall
              <lb/>
            find it probable enough, that each of them
              <lb/>
            may be a ſeveral World. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Eſpecially, ſince</s>
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