Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="110" file="0122" n="122" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            as ſhe is beheld through the advantage of a
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            dark medium, but as ſhe ſeems in the day time:
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now, in any clear Sun-ſhine day, our Earth
              <lb/>
            does appear as bright as the Moon, which at
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            the ſame time does ſeem like ſome duskiſh
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            Cloud (as any little Obſervation may eaſily
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            manifeſt.) </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Therefore we need not doubt but
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            that the Earth is as well able to give Light, as
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            the Moon. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">To this, it may be added, that
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            thoſe very Clouds, which in the day time
              <lb/>
            ſeem to be of an equal Light to the Moon, do
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            in the Evening become as dark as our Earth; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <lb/>
            and as for thoſe of them, which are looked
              <lb/>
            upon at any great diſtance, they are often mi-
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            ſtaken for the Mountains.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">4. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis conſiderable, that though the Moon
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            ſeem to be of ſo great a Brightneſs in the Night,
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            by reaſon of its nearneſs unto thoſe ſeveral ſha-
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            dows which it caſts, yet is of it ſelf Weaker
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            than that part of Twilight, which uſually we
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            have for half an Hour after Sun-ſet, becauſe we
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            cannot, till after that time, Diſcern any ſhadow
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            to be made by it.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">5. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Conſider the great Diſtance at which
              <lb/>
            we behold the Planets, for this muſt needs add
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            much to their Shining ; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and therefore Guſanus
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            (in the above cited Place) thinks, that if a Man
              <lb/>
            were in the Sun, that Planet would not appear
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            ſo Bright to him, as now it doth to us, becauſe
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            then his Eye could diſcern but little, whereas
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            here, we may Comprehend the Beams as they
              <lb/>
            are contracted in a narrow Body. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Keplar be-
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            holding the Earth from a high Mountain, when
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            it was Enlightened by the Sun, Confeſſes that
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            it appeared unto him of an incredible Bright-</s>
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