Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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          <p>
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              <pb o="138" file="0150" n="150" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            may not Succeeding times, Raiſe up ſome Spirits
              <lb/>
            as Eminent for new Attemps and Strange In-
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            ventions, as any that were before them? </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis
              <lb/>
            the Opinion of Keplar, that as ſoon as the art
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0150-01a" xlink:href="note-0150-01"/>
            of Flying is Found out, ſome of their Nation
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            will make one of the firſt Colonies, that ſhall
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            Tranſplant into that other World. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I Suppoſe,
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            his Appropriating this Preheminence to his
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            own Country-Men, may ariſe from an Over-
              <lb/>
            partial Affection to them. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But yet thus far
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            I Agree with him, That when ever that Art
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            is Invented, or any other, wherby a Man may
              <lb/>
            be Conveyed ſome Twenty Miles high, or
              <lb/>
            thereabouts, then, ’tis not altogether Improba-
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            ble that ſome or other may be Succeſsful in
              <lb/>
            this Attempt.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
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          <div type="float" level="2" n="2">
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0150-01" xlink:href="note-0150-01a" xml:space="preserve">Diſſerta.
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            cum Nun.
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            Sider.</note>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For a better Clearing of which, I ſhall firſt
              <lb/>
            lay Down, and then Anſwer thoſe Doubts that
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            may make it ſeem utterly Impoſſible.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Theſe are Chiefly Three.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The Firſt, taken from the Natural Heavi-
              <lb/>
            neſs of a Mans Body, whereby it is made Un-
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            fit for the Motion of Aſcent, together with
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            the Vaſt Diſtance of that Place from us.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From the Extream Coldneſs of the Æthe-
              <lb/>
            real Air.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">3. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The Extream Thinneſs of it.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Both which muſt needs make it Impaſſible,
              <lb/>
            though it were but as many Single Miles thi-
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            ther, as it is Thouſands.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For the Firſt, Though it were Suppoſed
              <lb/>
            that a Man could Fly, yet we may well think
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            he would be very Slow in it, ſince he hath ſo
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            Heavy a Body, and ſuch a one too, as Nature
              <lb/>
            did not Principally Intend, for that kind of</s>
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