Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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        <div type="section" level="1" n="43">
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="141" file="0153" n="153" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            this Orb of vaporous Air, it might there reſt
              <lb/>
            immovable, and would not have in it any pro-
              <lb/>
            penſion to this motion of Deſcent.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For the better illuſtration of this, you muſt
              <lb/>
            know, that the heavineſs of a body, or (as
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0153-01a" xlink:href="note-0153-01"/>
            Ariſtotle defines it) the proneneſs of it to tend
              <lb/>
            down unto ſome Centre, is not any abſolute
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            quality intrinſical unto it, as if, whereever the
              <lb/>
            body did retain its Eſſence, it muſt alſo retain
              <lb/>
            this quality: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">or as if Nature had emplanted in
              <lb/>
            every condenſed Body Appetitionem centri, & </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <lb/>
            fugam extremitatis. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Such a Love to the Cen-
              <lb/>
            tre, and hatred to the Extremities. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Becauſe
              <lb/>
            one of theſe being leſs than a quantity, and the
              <lb/>
            other no more, cannot have any power of At-
              <lb/>
            traction or Diſpulſion in them. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">According to
              <lb/>
            that common principle, Quantitatis nulla eſt
              <lb/>
            efficacia.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <div type="float" level="2" n="4">
            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0153-01" xlink:href="note-0153-01a" xml:space="preserve">De cælo
              <lb/>
            lib.4.cap.1.</note>
          </div>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But now the true nature of Gravity is this.
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0153-02a" xlink:href="note-0153-02"/>
            ’Tis ſuch a reſpective mutual deſire of Union,
              <lb/>
            whereby condenſed Bodies, when they come
              <lb/>
            within the Sphere of their own Vigour, do
              <lb/>
            naturally apply themſelves, one to another by
              <lb/>
            Attraction or Coition. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But being both with-
              <lb/>
            out the reach of eithers Virtue, they can ceaſe
              <lb/>
            to move, and though they have general Apti-
              <lb/>
            tude, yet they have not any preſent Inclinati-
              <lb/>
            on or proneneſs to one another. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And ſo con-
              <lb/>
            ſequently, cannot be ſtiled heavy.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <div type="float" level="2" n="5">
            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0153-02" xlink:href="note-0153-02a" xml:space="preserve">A magne-
              <lb/>
            tical natu-
              <lb/>
            ral axtra-
              <lb/>
            ction.
              <lb/>
            So Keplar
              <lb/>
            Somn.
              <lb/>
            Aſtron. N.
              <lb/>
            66.
              <lb/>
            Coper. l. 1.
              <lb/>
            cap. 26.
              <lb/>
            Foſcarin in
              <lb/>
            epiſt. ad
              <lb/>
            Sebaſt.
              <lb/>
            Fantonum.</note>
          </div>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The meaning of this will be clearly Illuſtra-
              <lb/>
            ted by a Simtlitude. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">As any light Body
              <lb/>
            (ſuppoſe the Sun) does ſend forth his Beams
              <lb/>
            in an orbicular form; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo likewiſe any magneti-
              <lb/>
            cal Body, for inſtance, a round Load-ſtone does
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0153-03a" xlink:href="note-0153-03"/>
            caſt abroad his magnetical Vigour in a Sphere.
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <div type="float" level="2" n="6">
            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0153-03" xlink:href="note-0153-03a" xml:space="preserve">Gilbert de
              <lb/>
            Maguete.
              <lb/>
            l. 2. cap. 7.</note>
          </div>
        </div>
      </text>
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