Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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        <div type="section" level="1" n="43">
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="153" file="0165" n="165" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            the Eaſt to be altered with the leaſt Light,
              <lb/>
            they would by the Situation of the Stars
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            find how many degrees the Sun was below the
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            Horizon, which was uſually about 18. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From
              <lb/>
            whence they would eaſily conclude, how high
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            that Air muſt be above us, which the Sun could
              <lb/>
            ſhine upon, when he was 18 Degrees below
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            us. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And from this obſervation it was conclu-
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0165-01a" xlink:href="note-0165-01"/>
            ded to be about 52 Miles high.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <div type="float" level="2" n="17">
            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0165-01" xlink:href="note-0165-01a" xml:space="preserve">Vitel. l. 10;
              <lb/>
            Theo. 7.</note>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But in this Concluſion, the Antients were
              <lb/>
            much deceived, becauſe they proceeded on a
              <lb/>
            wrong ground, whilſt they ſuppoſed that the
              <lb/>
            ſhining of the Suns direct Rays upon the Air
              <lb/>
            was the only reaſon of Grepuſculum; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">whereas
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0165-02a" xlink:href="note-0165-02"/>
            ’tis certain that there are many other things
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            which may alſo concur to the cauſing of it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">As,</s>
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          <div type="float" level="2" n="18">
            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0165-02" xlink:href="note-0165-02a" xml:space="preserve">Keplar. Ep.
              <lb/>
            Coper. l. 1.
              <lb/>
            part. 3.</note>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Some bright Clouds below the Horizon,
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            which being illuminated by the Sun, may be
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            the means of conveying ſome Light to our Air,
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            before the direct Rays can touch it.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The often refraction of the Rays, which
              <lb/>
            ſuffer a frequent Repercuſſion from the Cavi-
              <lb/>
            ty of this Sphere, may likewiſe yield us ſome
              <lb/>
            Light.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">3. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And ſo may the Orb of enlightned Air
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            compaſſing the Sun, part of which muſt riſe
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            before his Body.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The ſecond way whereby we may more
              <lb/>
            ſurely ſind the Altitude of this groſſer Air, is
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            by taking the higheſt Cloud: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">which may be
              <lb/>
            done, 1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Either as they uſe to meaſure the
              <lb/>
            Altitude of things that cannot be approached
              <lb/>
            unto, viz. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">by two Stations, when two Perſons
              <lb/>
            ſhall at the ſame time, in ſeveral places, ob-
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            ſerve the Declination of any Cloud from the</s>
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