Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

List of thumbnails

< >
171
171 (159)
172
172 (160)
173
173
174
174
175
175
176
176
177
177
178
178
179
179
180
180
< >
page |< < (24) of 370 > >|
That the Earth may be a Planet.
    <echo version="1.0RC">
      <text xml:lang="en" type="free">
        <div type="section" level="1" n="56">
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="24" file="0204" n="204" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            tilia, not ſuch curioſities of Nature as are
              <lb/>
            not eaſily apprehended.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis not only beſides that which is the
              <lb/>
            chief purpoſe of theſe places, but it might
              <lb/>
            happen alſo to be ſomewhat oppoſite unto
              <lb/>
            it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For Men being naturally unapt to be-
              <lb/>
            lieve any thing that ſeems contrary to their
              <lb/>
            ſenſes, might upon this begin to queſtion
              <lb/>
            the Authority of that Book which affirmed
              <lb/>
            it, or at leaſt to wreſt Scripture ſome wrong
              <lb/>
            way, to force it to ſome other ſence which
              <lb/>
            might be more agreeable to their own falſe
              <lb/>
            Imagination. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <anchor type="note" xlink:href="" symbol="*"/>
            Tertullian tells us of ſome
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0204-01a" xlink:href="note-0204-01"/>
            Hereticks, who when they were plainly con-
              <lb/>
            futed out of any Scripture, would preſently
              <lb/>
            accuſe thoſe Texts or Books to be Fallible,
              <lb/>
            and of no Authority; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and rather yield
              <lb/>
            Scripture to be erroneous, than forgo thoſe
              <lb/>
            Tenents for which they thought there was
              <lb/>
            ſo good reaſon. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So likewiſe might it have
              <lb/>
            been in theſe Points, which ſeem to bear in
              <lb/>
            them ſo much contradiction to the ſenſes
              <lb/>
            and common opinion: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and therefore ’tis
              <lb/>
            excellent advice ſet down by
              <anchor type="note" xlink:href="" symbol="*"/>
            S. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Auſtin;</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0204-02a" xlink:href="note-0204-02"/>
            Quod nibil credere de re obſcurá temere debe-
              <lb/>
            mus, ne forte quod postea veritas patefecerit,
              <lb/>
            quamvis libris ſanctis, ſive Teſtamenti veteris,
              <lb/>
            ſive novi, nullo modo eſſe poſſit adverſum, ta-
              <lb/>
            men propter amorem noſtri erroris oderimus:
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">That we ſhould not haſtily ſettle our Opi-
              <lb/>
            nions concerning any obſcure matter, leſt
              <lb/>
            afterwards, the Truth being diſcovered,
              <lb/>
            (which however it may ſeem, cannot be
              <lb/>
            repugnant to any thing in Scripture) we</s>
          </p>
        </div>
      </text>
    </echo>