Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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        <div type="section" level="1" n="31">
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="38" file="0050" n="50" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            However, the World would have no great
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            Loſs in being depriv'd of this Muſick, unleſs
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            at ſome times we had the priviledge to hear
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            it: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Then indeed Philo the Jew thinks it would
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            ſave us the Charges of Dyet, and we might
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0050-01a" xlink:href="note-0050-01"/>
            Live at an eaſier Rate, by feeding on the Ear
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            only, and receiving no other Nouriſhment;
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and for this very Reaſon (ſays he) was Moſes
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            Enabled to tarry Forty Days and Forty Nights
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            in the Mount without eating any thing, be-
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            cauſe he there heard the Melody of the Hea-
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            vens.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">-Riſum teneatis. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I know this Muſick
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            hath had great Patrons, both Sacred and Pro-
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            phane Authors,ſuch as Ambroſe, Bede, Boetius,
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            Aneſelme, Plato, Cicero, and others; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but be-
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            cauſe it is not now, I think, Affirm'd by any,
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            I ſhall not therefore beſtow eìther Pains or
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            Time in arguing againſt it.</s>
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          </p>
          <div type="float" level="2" n="11">
            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0049-02" xlink:href="note-0049-02a" xml:space="preserve">3</note>
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0050-01" xlink:href="note-0050-01a" xml:space="preserve">De ſomniis.</note>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">It may ſuffice that I have only Named theſe
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            Three laſt, and for the two more neceſſary,
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            have referred the Reader to others for ſatis-
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            faction. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I ſhall in the next place Proceed to
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            the Nature of the Moons Body, to know whe-
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            ther that be Capable of any ſuch Conditions,
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            as may make it poſſible to be Inhabited, and
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            what thoſe Qualities are wherein it more near-
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            ly Agrees with our Earth.</s>
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        <div type="section" level="1" n="32">
          <head xml:space="preserve">PROP. IV.</head>
          <head xml:space="preserve">That the Moon is a Solid, Compacted, Opacous
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          Body.</head>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I Shall not need to ſtand long in the Proof of
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            this Propoſition, ſince it is a Truth already</s>
          </p>
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