Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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        <div type="section" level="1" n="63">
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="127" file="0307" n="307" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            experiment; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If a Man upon a running
              <lb/>
            Horſe, ſhould, in his ſwifteſt courſe, let
              <lb/>
            fall a Bullet, or Stone, theſe heavy Bodies,
              <lb/>
            beſides their own deſcent, would alſo parti-
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            cipate that tranſverſe motion of the Horſe.
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For as thoſe things that are thrown from us,
              <lb/>
            do continue their motion when they are out
              <lb/>
            of the hand in the open Air: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo likewiſe
              <lb/>
            muſt it be, when the force is conferred by
              <lb/>
            that motion which the Arm has from the
              <lb/>
            Horſe. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">While a Man is riding, his Arm is
              <lb/>
            alſo carried by the ſame ſwiftneſs of the
              <lb/>
            Horſe; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">therefore, if he ſhould only open
              <lb/>
            his Hand, and let fall any thing, it would
              <lb/>
            not deſcend in a ſtrait Line, but muſt ne-
              <lb/>
            ceſſarily be driven forward, by reaſon of
              <lb/>
            that force impreſſed in it by the ſwiftneſs of
              <lb/>
            the Horſe, which is alſo communicated to
              <lb/>
            the Arm; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">it being all one in effect, whether
              <lb/>
            or no the Arm be moved by a particular mo-
              <lb/>
            tion of its own, as it is in caſting of things
              <lb/>
            from us, or by the common motion of the
              <lb/>
            Body, as it is in dropping any thing from
              <lb/>
            us, either when we are on the top of ſome
              <lb/>
            ſailing Ship, as in the former, or on ſome
              <lb/>
            running Horſe, as in the latter Inſtance.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <div type="float" level="2" n="9">
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0306-01" xlink:href="note-0306-01a" xml:space="preserve">Syſt. Mun-
              <lb/>
            di. Col-
              <lb/>
            loq. 2.</note>
          </div>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">What hath been ſaid concerning the Mo-
              <lb/>
            tion of deſcent, is likevviſe appliable, both
              <lb/>
            to that vvhich is upward, and that vvhich is
              <lb/>
            tranſverſal. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So that vvhen ’tis objected, If
              <lb/>
            the Earth did move, then a Bullet that
              <lb/>
            vvere ſhot up perpendicularly, would be
              <lb/>
            forſaken by it, and not deſcend to the place
              <lb/>
            from whence it aroſe: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">We anſwer; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">That</s>
          </p>
        </div>
      </text>
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