Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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          <pb o="107" file="0287" n="287" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">As for the Difficulties which concern the
              <lb/>
            ſecond of theſe, they have been already
              <lb/>
            handled in the ſixth Propoſition, where the
              <lb/>
            Earth's Eccentricity was maintained.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So that the chief buſineſs of this Chap-
              <lb/>
            ter, is to defend the Earth's Diurnal Moti-
              <lb/>
            on, againſt the Objections of our Adverſa-
              <lb/>
            ries. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Sundry of which Objections, to ſpeak
              <lb/>
            (as the Truth is) do bear in them a great
              <lb/>
            ſhew of probability, and ſuch too (as it
              <lb/>
            ſeems) was very efficacious, ſince Ariſtotle
              <lb/>
            and Ptolomy, &</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">c. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Men of excellent Parts,
              <lb/>
            and deep Judgments, did ground upon them,
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            as being of infallible and neceſſary conſe-
              <lb/>
            quence.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I ſhall reckon them up ſeverally, and ſet
              <lb/>
            down ſuch Anſwers unto each, as may yield
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            ſome ſatisfaction to every indifferent ſeeker
              <lb/>
            of Truth.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Firſt then, ’tis objected from our ſenſes;
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If the Earth did move, we ſhould perceive
              <lb/>
            it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The Weſtern Mountains would then ap-
              <lb/>
            pear to aſcend towards theStars, rather than
              <lb/>
            the Stars to deſcend below them.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I anſwer: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The ſight judges of Motion,
              <lb/>
            according as any thing does deſert the Plane
              <lb/>
            whereon it ſelf is ſeated: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">which Plane
              <lb/>
            every where keeping the ſame ſcituation and
              <lb/>
            diſtance, in reſpect of the Eye, does there-
              <lb/>
            fore ſeem immovable unto it, and the mo-
              <lb/>
            tion will appear in thoſe Stars and parts of
              <lb/>
            the Heaven, through which the Vertical
              <lb/>
            Line does paſs.</s>
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