Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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          <pb o="110" file="0290" n="290" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I anſwer: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The deceit here, is not con
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            cerning the Light or Colour of thoſe Bodies
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            but concerning their Motion; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">which is nei-
              <lb/>
            ther the primary nor proper Object of the
              <lb/>
            Eye, but reckoned amongſt the Object a Com-
              <lb/>
            munia.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Another common Argument againſt
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            this Motion, is taken from the danger that
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            would thence ariſe unto all high Buildings,
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            which by this would quickly be ruinated and
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            ſcattered abroad.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I anſwer: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">This Motion is ſuppoſed to be
              <lb/>
            natural; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and thoſe things which are ac-
              <lb/>
            cording to Nature, have contrary effects to
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            other matters, which are by force and vio-
              <lb/>
            lence. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now it belongs unto things of this
              <lb/>
            latter kind, to be inconſtant and hurtful;
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">whereas thoſe of the firſt kind muſt be re-
              <lb/>
            gular, and tending to conſervation. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The
              <lb/>
            Motion of the Earth, is always equal and
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            like it ſelf; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">not by ſtarts and fits. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If a
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            Glaſs of Beer may ſtand firmly enough in a
              <lb/>
            Ship, when it moves ſwiftly upon a ſmooth
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            ftream; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">much leſs then will the Motion of
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            the Earth, which is more natural, and ſo
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            conſequently more equal, cauſe any danger
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            unto thoſe Buildings that are erected upon
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            it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And therefore to ſuſpect any ſuch event,
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            would be like the fear of Lactantius, who
              <lb/>
            would not acknowledg the being of any
              <lb/>
            Antipodes, leſt then he might be forced to
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0290-01a" xlink:href="note-0290-01"/>
            grant that they ſhould fall down unto the
              <lb/>
            Heavens. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">We have equal reaſon to be afraid
              <lb/>
            of high Buildings, if the whole World</s>
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