Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Eartb may be a Planet.
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="100" file="0280" n="280" rhead="That the Eartb may be a Planet."/>
            the like Artificial Inſtruments of Moti-
              <lb/>
            on.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">There be ſundry other Particulars, where-
              <lb/>
            by this Opinion concerning the Sun's being
              <lb/>
            in the Centre, may be ſtrongly evidenced;
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Which becauſe they relate unto ſeveral Mo-
              <lb/>
            tions alſo, cannot therefore properly be in-
              <lb/>
            fiſted on in this place. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">You may eaſily e-
              <lb/>
            nough diſcern them, by conſidering the
              <lb/>
            whole Frame of the Heavens, as they are
              <lb/>
            according to the Syſteme of Copernicus; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <lb/>
            wherein all thoſe probable Reſolutions that
              <lb/>
            are given for divers appearances amongſt
              <lb/>
            the Planets, do mainly depend upon this
              <lb/>
            Suppoſition, that the Sun is in the Centre. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <lb/>
            Which Arguments (were there no other)
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            might be abundantly enough for the confir-
              <lb/>
            mation of it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But for the greater plenty,
              <lb/>
            there are likewiſe theſe Probabilities conſi-
              <lb/>
            derable.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">It may ſeem agreeable to reaſon, That
              <lb/>
            the Light which is diffuſed in ſeveral Stars
              <lb/>
            through the Circumference of the World,
              <lb/>
            ſhould be more eminently contained, and
              <lb/>
            (as it were) contracted in the Centre of
              <lb/>
            it, which can only be by placing the Sun
              <lb/>
            there.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis an Argument of
              <anchor type="note" xlink:href="" symbol="*"/>
            Clavius, and
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0280-01a" xlink:href="note-0280-01"/>
            ſrequently urged by our Adverſaries, That
              <lb/>
            the moſt natural ſcituation of the Sun's Bo-
              <lb/>
            dy was in the midſt, betwixt the other Pla-
              <lb/>
            nets; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and that for this Reaſon, becauſe
              <lb/>
            from thence he might more conveniently di-
              <lb/>
            ſtribute amongſt them both his Light and</s>
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