Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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          <pb o="149" file="0329" n="329" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">So that this firſt evaſion of our Adverſa-
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            ries, will not ſhelter them from the force of
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            that Argument, which is taken from the in-
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            credible ſwiftneſs of the Heavens.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Whereas they tell us, in the ſecond
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            place, that a bigger Body, as a Millſtone,
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            will naturally deſcend ſwifter than a leſs, as
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            a Pebble. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I anſwer : </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">This is not becauſe
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            ſuch a great Body is in it ſelf more eaſily
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            movable; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but becauſe the bigger any thing
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            is which is out of its own place, the ſtron-
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            ger will be its natural deſire of returning
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            thither, and ſo conſequently the quicker its
              <lb/>
            motion. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But now thoſe Bodies that move
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            circularly, are always in their proper ſcitu-
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            ations, and ſo the ſame reaſon is not apply-
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            able unto them. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And then, whereas ’tis
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            ſaid, that Magnitude does always add to the
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            ſwiftneſs of a violent motion, (as Wind
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            will move a great Ship ſooner than a little
              <lb/>
            Stone): </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">We anſwer, This is not becauſe a
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            Ship is more eaſily movable in it ſelf than a
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            little Stone: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For I ſuppoſe, the Objector
              <lb/>
            will not think he can throw the one as far as
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            the other, but becauſe theſe little Bodies
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            are not ſo liable to that kind of vio-
              <lb/>
            lence, from whence their Motion does pro-
              <lb/>
            ceed.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">As for thoſe Inſtances which are cited
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            to illuſtrate the poſſibility of this ſwiftneſs in
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            the Heavens, we anſwer: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The paſſage of a
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            Sound, is but very ſlow in compariſon to
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            the motion of the Heavens. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And then be-
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            ſides, the ſwiftneſs of the Species of Sound</s>
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