Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="126" file="0306" n="306" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Though the inſtance of a Ship, may
              <lb/>
            ſerve as a proof for this opinion, it being
              <lb/>
            an Argument, a minori ad majus, from an ac-
              <lb/>
            cidental Motion, to a natural; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet it will
              <lb/>
            not ſerve againſt it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For though it were
              <lb/>
            not thus in accidental Motions, yet this
              <lb/>
            would not hinder but that it might be ſo in
              <lb/>
            thoſe that are ſuppoſed to be proper and
              <lb/>
            natural.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">As for that Experiment it ſelf, ’tis but
              <lb/>
            a groundleſs imagination, and was never
              <lb/>
            yet conſirmed by any particular Experience,
              <lb/>
            becauſe ’tis certain the Event would be clean
              <lb/>
            otherwiſe, as ſhall be proved in the third
              <lb/>
            way of anſwering.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">3. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The third and laſt way of clearing the
              <lb/>
            Doubts in the ſixth Argument, is, by ſhew-
              <lb/>
            ing the like participation of motion, in thoſe
              <lb/>
            things that are in the open parts of a Ship.
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">To which purpoſe G allilæus urges thìs Ex-
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0306-01a" xlink:href="note-0306-01"/>
            periment: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If any one ſhould let fall a Stone
              <lb/>
            from an high Maſt, he would find, Lapidem
              <lb/>
            in eunde in ſemper Navis locum decidere, ſeu
              <lb/>
            conſiſtat illa, ſeu quantacunque velocitate movea-
              <lb/>
            tur: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">That the Stone would always deſcend
              <lb/>
            unto the very ſame place, whether or no
              <lb/>
            the Ship did move or ſtand ſtill. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The Rea-
              <lb/>
            ſon of which is, becauſe the Motion of the
              <lb/>
            Ship is likewiſe impreſſed in the Stone: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">which
              <lb/>
            Impreſſion is not equally prevalent in a light
              <lb/>
            Body, as a Feather, or Wool; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">becauſe the
              <lb/>
            Air, which has power over them, is not
              <lb/>
            carried along by the ſame motion of the
              <lb/>
            Ship. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus likewiſe will it be in this other</s>
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