Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planct.
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              <pb o="142" file="0322" n="322" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planct."/>
            the Equator, in one beating of the Pulſe, muſt
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            move 2528 of theſe miles.</s>
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            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0321-01" xlink:href="note-0321-01a" xml:space="preserve">Vid. Mæſt.
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            Epit. Aſtr.
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            l. 1. in fine.</note>
            <note symbol="*" position="right" xlink:label="note-0321-02" xlink:href="note-0321-02a" xml:space="preserve">De Prop.
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            l. 5 prop. 58</note>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis the Affertion of
              <anchor type="note" xlink:href="" symbol=""/>
            Clavius, that though
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0322-01a" xlink:href="note-0322-01"/>
            the diſtance of the Orbs, and ſo conſe-
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            quently their ſwiftneſs, ſeem to be altoge-
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            ther incredible; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet it is rather far greater
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            in it ſelf, than Aſtronomers uſually ſuppoſe
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            it; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and yet (ſaith he) according to the
              <lb/>
            common Grounds, every Star in the Equa-
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            tor, muſt move 42398437 {1/2} miles in an hour.
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And though a Man ſhould conſtantly travel
              <lb/>
            40 miles a day, yet he would not be able to
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            go ſo far as a Star does in one hour, under
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            2904 Years: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Or if we will ſuppoſe an Ar-
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            row to be of the ſame ſwiftneſs, then muſt
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            it compaſs this great Globe of Earth and
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            Water 1884 times in an hour. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And a Bird
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            that could but fly as faſt, might go round
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            the World ſeven times in that ſpace, whilſt
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            one could ſay, Ave Maria, gratia plena, Do-
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            minus tecum.</s>
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            <note symbol="" position="left" xlink:label="note-0322-01" xlink:href="note-0322-01a" xml:space="preserve">Commen.
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            in prim.
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            cap.Sphær.</note>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Which though it be a pretty round pace,
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            yet you muſt conceive that all this is ſpoken
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            only of the eighth Sphere; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and ſo being
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            compared to the ſwiftneſs of the Primum
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            Mobile, is but a ſlow and heavy Motion.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For (ſaith the ſame Author) the thick-
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            neſs of each Orb is equal to the diſtance of
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            its concave Superſicies from the Centre of
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            the Earth. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus the Orb of the Moon does
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            contain as much ſpace in its thicknefs, as
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            there is betwixt the neareſt part of that
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            and the Centre. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus alſo the eight Sphere</s>
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