Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="145" file="0325" n="325" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            portion which ſhe obſerves in leſſer Matters.
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If this Globe of Earth only were appointed
              <lb/>
            to move every day round the Orb of the
              <lb/>
            fixed Stars, though it be but a little Body,
              <lb/>
            and ſo more capable of a ſwift motion; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <lb/>
            yet that ſwiftneſs would be ſo extreamly
              <lb/>
            diſproportionable unto it, that we could
              <lb/>
            not with reaſon conceive it poſſible, accord-
              <lb/>
            ing to the uſual courſe of Nature. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But now,
              <lb/>
            that the Heavens themſelves, of ſuch ſtrange
              <lb/>
            bigneſs, with ſo many Stars, which do ſo
              <lb/>
            far exceed the Magnitude of our Earth,
              <lb/>
            ſhould be able to turn about with the ſame
              <lb/>
            celerity; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Oh! ’tis altogether beyond the
              <lb/>
            fancy of a Poet, or a Madman.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For anſwer unto this Argument, our Ad-
              <lb/>
            verſaries tell us, that there is not in the
              <lb/>
            Heavens any repugnancy to ſo ſwift a Mo-
              <lb/>
            tion; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and that whether we conſider the na-
              <lb/>
            ture of thoſe Bodies; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">or, ſecondly, the
              <lb/>
            ſwiftneſs of this Motion.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For the Nature of thoſe
              <lb/>
            \\ Bodies, either their} Qualities.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">\\ Quantity.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">There is not in them the Qualities of
              <lb/>
            lightneſs or heavineſs, or any the leaſt con-
              <lb/>
            trariety that may make them reluctant to
              <lb/>
            one another.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Their Magnitude will help them in
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0325-01a" xlink:href="note-0325-01"/>
            their ſwiftneſs : </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For the greater any Body
              <lb/>
            is, the quicker will it be in its motion, and
              <lb/>
            that not only when it is moved by an inward
              <lb/>
            Principle, as a Millſtone will deſcend faſter</s>
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