Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="147" file="0327" n="327" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            on; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">becauſe Matter is of it ſelf a dull and
              <lb/>
            ſluggiſh thing; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and by ſo much the more, as
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            it is kept cloſe and condenſed together.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And though the followers of Ptolomy, do
              <lb/>
            with much confidence deny the Heavens to
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            be capable of any reluctancy to motion; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <lb/>
            yet it were eaſy to prove the contraby, out
              <lb/>
            of their own Principles. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis not conceiv-
              <lb/>
            able, how the upper Sphere ſhould move
              <lb/>
            the nether, unleſs their Superficies were full
              <lb/>
            of rugged parts, ( which they deny:) </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">or
              <lb/>
            elſe one of the Orbs muſt lean upon the o-
              <lb/>
            ther with its weight, and ſo makeit partake
              <lb/>
            of its own Motion. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And beſides, they tell us,
              <lb/>
            that the farther any Sphere is diſtant from
              <lb/>
            the Primum Mobile, the leſs is it hindred by
              <lb/>
            that in its proper courſe, and the ſooner
              <lb/>
            does it ſiniſh its own Revolution. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From
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            whence it will eaſily follow, that theſe Bo-
              <lb/>
            dies have reſiſtancy from one another.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I have often wondred, why amongſt the
              <lb/>
            inchanted Buildings of the Poets, they have
              <lb/>
            not fained any Caſtle to be made of the ſame
              <lb/>
            Materials with the ſolid Orbs, ſince in ſuch a
              <lb/>
            Fabrick, there would have been theſe emi-
              <lb/>
            nent Conveniences.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">It muſt needs be very pleaſant, by rea-
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            ſon of its perſpicuity, becauſe it is more
              <lb/>
            diaphanous than the Air it ſelf, and ſo the
              <lb/>
            Walls of it could not hinder the proſpect
              <lb/>
            any way.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Being ſo ſolid and impenitrable, it
              <lb/>
            muſt needs be excellent againſt all violence
              <lb/>
            of Weathers, as alſo againſt the aſſaults of</s>
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