Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="160" file="0340" n="340" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            days, does obſerve a Revolution about its
              <lb/>
            own Axis, and ſo carry along the Planets
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            that encompaſs it; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">which Planets are
              <lb/>
            therefore ſlower or ſwifter, according to
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            their diſtances from him.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If you ask, By what means the Sun can
              <lb/>
            produce ſuch a Motion?</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">He anſwers: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">By ſending forth a kind of
              <lb/>
            Magnetick Virtue in ſtreight Lines, from
              <lb/>
            each part of its Body; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">of which there is
              <lb/>
            always a conſtant ſucceſſion: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo that as
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            ſoon as one Beam of this Vigor has paſſed a
              <lb/>
            Planet, there is another preſently takes hold
              <lb/>
            of it, like the Teeth of a Wheel.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But how can any Virtue hold out to ſuch
              <lb/>
            a diſtance?</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">He anſwers: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Firſt, as Light and Heat,
              <lb/>
            together with thoſe other ſecret Influences,
              <lb/>
            which work upon Minerals in the Bowels of
              <lb/>
            the Earth: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo likewiſe may the Sun ſend
              <lb/>
            forth a Magnetick Motive Virtue, whoſe
              <lb/>
            Power may be continued to the fartheſt Pla-
              <lb/>
            nets.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Secondly. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If the Moon, according to
              <lb/>
            common Philoſophy, may move the Sea,
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            why then may not the Sun move this Globe
              <lb/>
            of Earth?</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">In ſuch Queries as theſe, we can conclude
              <lb/>
            only from Conjectures, that Speech of the
              <lb/>
            Wiſe Man, Eccleſ. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">3. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">11. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">being more eſpe-
              <lb/>
            cially verified of Aſtronomical Queſtions,
              <lb/>
            concerning the Frame of the whole Uni-
              <lb/>
            verſe, That no Man can find out the Works of</s>
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