Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="173" file="0353" n="353" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            appear ſixty times bigger when he is near
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            us, than at his greateſt diſtance; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">that he is
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            ſometimes in oppoſition to the Sun. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From
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            whence we may conclude, that his Orb does
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            contain our Earth within it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis obſerved
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            alſo, that he does conſtantly appear in the
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            Full, and never horned; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">from whence likewiſe
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            it is manifeſt, that the Sun is comprehended
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            within its Orb, as it is in that which is re-
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            preſented by the Circle E.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And becauſe the like appearances are ob-
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            ſerved in Jupiter and Saturn, (though in leſs
              <lb/>
            degrees) therefore we may with good rea-
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            ſon conceive them to be in the Heavens, after
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            ſome ſuch manner as they are here ſet down
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            in the Figure, by the Circles F G.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">As for the Moon; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">becauſe ſhe is ſome-
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            times in oppoſition to the Sun; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">therefore muſt
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            her Orb comprehend in it the Earth; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">be-
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            cauſe ſhe appears dark in her Conjunction,
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            and ſometimes eclipſes the Sun, therefore
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            that muſt neceſſarily be without her Orb, as
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            it is in that Epicycle at H. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">In the Centre of
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            which, the Earth muſt neceſſarily be ſcitua-
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            ted according to all thoſe appearances men-
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            tioned before. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So that the Orb of its an-
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            nual Motion, will be repreſented by the
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            Circle D.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">All which appearances, cannot ſo well be
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            reconciled by Ptolomy, Tycho, Origanus, or
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            by any other Hypotheſis, as by this of Co-
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            pernicus. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But the application of theſe to
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            the ſeveral Planets, together with ſun-
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            dry other particulars, concerning the Theo-</s>
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