Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

List of thumbnails

< >
81
81 (69)
82
82 (70)
83
83 (71)
84
84 (72)
85
85 (73)
86
86 (74)
87
87 (75)
88
88 (76)
89
89 (77)
90
90 (78)
< >
page |< < (69) of 370 > >|
That the Moon may be a World.
    <echo version="1.0RC">
      <text xml:lang="en" type="free">
        <div type="section" level="1" n="36">
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="69" file="0081" n="81" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            ſo much of the Beſpotted, as there is of the En-
              <lb/>
            lightned parts, wherefore ’tis Probable, that
              <lb/>
            there is no ſuch thing at all, or elſe, that the
              <lb/>
            Brighter parts are the Sea.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <div type="float" level="2" n="2">
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0080-02" xlink:href="note-0080-02a" xml:space="preserve">Exercit.
              <lb/>
            39.</note>
          </div>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The Water, by Reaſon of the Smoothneſs
              <lb/>
            of its Superficies, ſeems better able to Reflect
              <lb/>
            the Sun-Beams than the Earth, which in moſt
              <lb/>
            Places is ſo full of Ruggedneſs of Graſs and
              <lb/>
            Trees, and ſuch like Impediments of Reflexion;
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and beſides, common Experience ſhews, that the
              <lb/>
            Water Shines with a greater and more Glori-
              <lb/>
            ous Brightneſs than the Earth; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">therefore it
              <lb/>
            ſhould ſeem that the Spots are the Earth, and
              <lb/>
            the Brighter parts the Water. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But to the Firſt
              <lb/>
            it may be Anſwered.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">There is no great Probability in this
              <lb/>
            Conſequence, that becauſe ’tis ſo with us, there-
              <lb/>
            fore it muſt be ſo with the parts of the Moon,
              <lb/>
            for ſince there is ſuch a Difference betwixt
              <lb/>
            them in Divers other Reſpects, they may not
              <lb/>
            perhaps Agree in this.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">That Aſſertion of Scaliger is not by all
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0081-01a" xlink:href="note-0081-01"/>
            granted for a Truth. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Fromundus, with others,
              <lb/>
            think, that the Superficies of the Sea and Land,
              <lb/>
            in ſo much of the World as is already Diſcover-
              <lb/>
            ed, is equal, and of the ſame Extenſion.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <div type="float" level="2" n="3">
            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0081-01" xlink:href="note-0081-01a" xml:space="preserve">De Meteo.
              <lb/>
            ris. l. s. c. 1.
              <lb/>
            Art. 1.</note>
          </div>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">3. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The Orb of Thick and Vaporous Air
              <lb/>
            which incompaſſes theMoon, makes the Bright-
              <lb/>
            er parts of that Planet appear bigger than in
              <lb/>
            themſelves they are; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">as I ſhall ſhew after-
              <lb/>
            wards.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">To the Second it may be Anſwered, that
              <lb/>
            though the Water be of a ſmooth Superficies,
              <lb/>
            and ſo may ſeem moſt fit to Reverberate the
              <lb/>
            Light, yet becauſe ’tis of a Perſpicuous Nature</s>
          </p>
        </div>
      </text>
    </echo>