Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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          <pb o="155" file="0335" n="335" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But now, this Motion of theirs cannot
              <lb/>
            be cauſed by the Heavens; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and therefore it
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            muſt neceſſarily proceed from the Revoluti-
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            on of our Earth.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">That the Moon's Orb cannot carry along
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            with it the greater part of the Air wherein
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            theſe Comets are placed, might eaſily be
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            proved from the common Grounds. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For
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            the Concave Superficies of that Sphere, is
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            uſually ſuppoſed to be exactly terſe and
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            ſmooth; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo that the meer touch of it can-
              <lb/>
            not turn about the whole Element of Fire,
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            with a Motion that is not natural unto it.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Nor could this Elementary Fire, which they
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            imagine to be of a more rarified and ſubtil
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            Nature, communicate the ſame Motion to
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            the thicker Air, and that to the Waters (as
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            ſome affirm): </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For by what means could
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            that ſmooth Orb take hold of the adjoining
              <lb/>
            Air ? </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">To this Sarſius anſwers, that there are
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            great Gibboſities, and mountainous Inequa-
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            lities, in the Concavity of the loweſt Sphere,
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            and by theſe is it enabled to carry along
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            with it the Fire and Air. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But
              <anchor type="note" xlink:href="" symbol="*"/>
            Fromondus
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0335-01a" xlink:href="note-0335-01"/>
            tells him, Fictitia iſta, & </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ad fugam reperta
              <lb/>
            ſunt. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And yet his own Conjecture is ſcarce
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            ſo good, when he affirms, that this Motion
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            of the Ætherial Air, as alſo of that Ele-
              <lb/>
            mentary Air hard by us, is cauſed by that
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            ruggedneſs which there is in the Bodies of
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            the Planets; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">of which Opinion, we may,
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            with as good reaſon, ſay as he ſays to
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            Sarſius: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Fictitia iſta, & </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ad fugam reperta;
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Theſe things are meer Fictions, inven-</s>
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